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Jam Out to Julia Child, Auto-Tuned

Jam Out to Julia Child, Auto-Tuned


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Thanks to PBS for this very excellent mash-up

Sure, Rick Ross and other recording artists may have mentioned food in their lyrics, but none have actually sung about the act of cooking. Who better to take this on than Julia Child herself?

With a little help from remixer melodysheep and PBS (who also gave us that amazing Julia Child supercut), Julia Child gets the auto-tune treatment and starts singing about chocolate truffles, fresh salmon, and rolling out dough. It's food porn plus jammable beats plus completely sincere lyrics, all in one lovable Julia Child package titled "Keep on Cooking." And her advice? Still good as ever. (Sample: "You need some fat in your diet for your body to process your vitamins," or "freshness is essential, that makes all the difference.")

Whip this tune out at your next dinner party (or while you're cooking in the kitchen for some inspiration) and randomly find yourself humming along to "Bon appétit." Happy birthday, Julia Child! Listen below.


5 Celebrity Chefs Make Over Our Favorite Comfort Food Dishes

These old favorites taste even better with a modern twist.

We challenged a few of our favorite chefs to make five recipes from WD's archives easier and tastier. Mission accomplished! From a hearty stew to a loaded dessert, you can't go wrong with whipping up one of these transformed dishes.

A best-selling cookbook author, Marcus appears frequently on Chopped and is the head chef and owner of Red Rooster in New York City and London.

This Great Depression dish&mdashalso known as hobo stew&mdashwas originally a mix of meat, potatoes, and whatever other ingredients could be found. Marcus spiced things up by adding poblano peppers, adobo sauce, and fresh ginger. Letting the meat simmer in a slow cooker means no need to babysit a pot for hours.

Sara is the host of the PBS show Sara's Weeknight Meals, currently in its sixth season, and the author of multiple books, including Home Cooking 101.

In the years after World War II, chefs in big cities began putting this simple yet special buttery chicken dish on their menus to attract the recent influx of Russian and Ukrainian immigrants. Sara marinated the chicken to make it extra tender and flavorful, then revamped the flavors by combining the butter with Gorgonzola cheese and pairing the chicken with a creamy buffalo dipping sauce and a crunchy celery salad.

A reporter for the New York Times food section, Melissa writes the popular column "A Good Appetite" and has written nearly 40 cookbooks.

Thanks to Julia Child, French-influenced food was at its height in the 1960 s. This cross between grilled cheese and French toast gained popularity after it debuted at Disneyland. Melissa upgraded from ham and Swiss by using prosciutto, mozzarella, and a lemon-spiked fig jam. Then, instead of dipping it in batter and frying it, she brushed it and baked it for a lighter taste.

Carla is a Top Chef alum, cookbook author, cohost of The Chew, and owner of the restaurant Carla Hall's Southern Kitchen in Brooklyn.

Originally made with canned cream of mushroom soup and topped with potato chips, this casserole was king in the 1950 s, when food was all about convenience. Carla's vegetarian version has all the flavor and nostalgia of the classic, but with a homemade cream sauce and new ingredients like seaweed crisps.

Founder and CEO of the Milk Bar bakeries in New York City, where she creates innovative sweets, Christina is also a judge on MasterChef and MasterChef Junior.

Originally made with just wafer cookies and whipped cream, this no-bake cake was created before electric refrigeration became mainstream. Christina's version has fun and unexpected pantry ingredients like the ones found in her signature compost cookies: potato chips, pretzels, graham crackers, oats, and even coffee.


5 Celebrity Chefs Make Over Our Favorite Comfort Food Dishes

These old favorites taste even better with a modern twist.

We challenged a few of our favorite chefs to make five recipes from WD's archives easier and tastier. Mission accomplished! From a hearty stew to a loaded dessert, you can't go wrong with whipping up one of these transformed dishes.

A best-selling cookbook author, Marcus appears frequently on Chopped and is the head chef and owner of Red Rooster in New York City and London.

This Great Depression dish&mdashalso known as hobo stew&mdashwas originally a mix of meat, potatoes, and whatever other ingredients could be found. Marcus spiced things up by adding poblano peppers, adobo sauce, and fresh ginger. Letting the meat simmer in a slow cooker means no need to babysit a pot for hours.

Sara is the host of the PBS show Sara's Weeknight Meals, currently in its sixth season, and the author of multiple books, including Home Cooking 101.

In the years after World War II, chefs in big cities began putting this simple yet special buttery chicken dish on their menus to attract the recent influx of Russian and Ukrainian immigrants. Sara marinated the chicken to make it extra tender and flavorful, then revamped the flavors by combining the butter with Gorgonzola cheese and pairing the chicken with a creamy buffalo dipping sauce and a crunchy celery salad.

A reporter for the New York Times food section, Melissa writes the popular column "A Good Appetite" and has written nearly 40 cookbooks.

Thanks to Julia Child, French-influenced food was at its height in the 1960 s. This cross between grilled cheese and French toast gained popularity after it debuted at Disneyland. Melissa upgraded from ham and Swiss by using prosciutto, mozzarella, and a lemon-spiked fig jam. Then, instead of dipping it in batter and frying it, she brushed it and baked it for a lighter taste.

Carla is a Top Chef alum, cookbook author, cohost of The Chew, and owner of the restaurant Carla Hall's Southern Kitchen in Brooklyn.

Originally made with canned cream of mushroom soup and topped with potato chips, this casserole was king in the 1950 s, when food was all about convenience. Carla's vegetarian version has all the flavor and nostalgia of the classic, but with a homemade cream sauce and new ingredients like seaweed crisps.

Founder and CEO of the Milk Bar bakeries in New York City, where she creates innovative sweets, Christina is also a judge on MasterChef and MasterChef Junior.

Originally made with just wafer cookies and whipped cream, this no-bake cake was created before electric refrigeration became mainstream. Christina's version has fun and unexpected pantry ingredients like the ones found in her signature compost cookies: potato chips, pretzels, graham crackers, oats, and even coffee.


5 Celebrity Chefs Make Over Our Favorite Comfort Food Dishes

These old favorites taste even better with a modern twist.

We challenged a few of our favorite chefs to make five recipes from WD's archives easier and tastier. Mission accomplished! From a hearty stew to a loaded dessert, you can't go wrong with whipping up one of these transformed dishes.

A best-selling cookbook author, Marcus appears frequently on Chopped and is the head chef and owner of Red Rooster in New York City and London.

This Great Depression dish&mdashalso known as hobo stew&mdashwas originally a mix of meat, potatoes, and whatever other ingredients could be found. Marcus spiced things up by adding poblano peppers, adobo sauce, and fresh ginger. Letting the meat simmer in a slow cooker means no need to babysit a pot for hours.

Sara is the host of the PBS show Sara's Weeknight Meals, currently in its sixth season, and the author of multiple books, including Home Cooking 101.

In the years after World War II, chefs in big cities began putting this simple yet special buttery chicken dish on their menus to attract the recent influx of Russian and Ukrainian immigrants. Sara marinated the chicken to make it extra tender and flavorful, then revamped the flavors by combining the butter with Gorgonzola cheese and pairing the chicken with a creamy buffalo dipping sauce and a crunchy celery salad.

A reporter for the New York Times food section, Melissa writes the popular column "A Good Appetite" and has written nearly 40 cookbooks.

Thanks to Julia Child, French-influenced food was at its height in the 1960 s. This cross between grilled cheese and French toast gained popularity after it debuted at Disneyland. Melissa upgraded from ham and Swiss by using prosciutto, mozzarella, and a lemon-spiked fig jam. Then, instead of dipping it in batter and frying it, she brushed it and baked it for a lighter taste.

Carla is a Top Chef alum, cookbook author, cohost of The Chew, and owner of the restaurant Carla Hall's Southern Kitchen in Brooklyn.

Originally made with canned cream of mushroom soup and topped with potato chips, this casserole was king in the 1950 s, when food was all about convenience. Carla's vegetarian version has all the flavor and nostalgia of the classic, but with a homemade cream sauce and new ingredients like seaweed crisps.

Founder and CEO of the Milk Bar bakeries in New York City, where she creates innovative sweets, Christina is also a judge on MasterChef and MasterChef Junior.

Originally made with just wafer cookies and whipped cream, this no-bake cake was created before electric refrigeration became mainstream. Christina's version has fun and unexpected pantry ingredients like the ones found in her signature compost cookies: potato chips, pretzels, graham crackers, oats, and even coffee.


5 Celebrity Chefs Make Over Our Favorite Comfort Food Dishes

These old favorites taste even better with a modern twist.

We challenged a few of our favorite chefs to make five recipes from WD's archives easier and tastier. Mission accomplished! From a hearty stew to a loaded dessert, you can't go wrong with whipping up one of these transformed dishes.

A best-selling cookbook author, Marcus appears frequently on Chopped and is the head chef and owner of Red Rooster in New York City and London.

This Great Depression dish&mdashalso known as hobo stew&mdashwas originally a mix of meat, potatoes, and whatever other ingredients could be found. Marcus spiced things up by adding poblano peppers, adobo sauce, and fresh ginger. Letting the meat simmer in a slow cooker means no need to babysit a pot for hours.

Sara is the host of the PBS show Sara's Weeknight Meals, currently in its sixth season, and the author of multiple books, including Home Cooking 101.

In the years after World War II, chefs in big cities began putting this simple yet special buttery chicken dish on their menus to attract the recent influx of Russian and Ukrainian immigrants. Sara marinated the chicken to make it extra tender and flavorful, then revamped the flavors by combining the butter with Gorgonzola cheese and pairing the chicken with a creamy buffalo dipping sauce and a crunchy celery salad.

A reporter for the New York Times food section, Melissa writes the popular column "A Good Appetite" and has written nearly 40 cookbooks.

Thanks to Julia Child, French-influenced food was at its height in the 1960 s. This cross between grilled cheese and French toast gained popularity after it debuted at Disneyland. Melissa upgraded from ham and Swiss by using prosciutto, mozzarella, and a lemon-spiked fig jam. Then, instead of dipping it in batter and frying it, she brushed it and baked it for a lighter taste.

Carla is a Top Chef alum, cookbook author, cohost of The Chew, and owner of the restaurant Carla Hall's Southern Kitchen in Brooklyn.

Originally made with canned cream of mushroom soup and topped with potato chips, this casserole was king in the 1950 s, when food was all about convenience. Carla's vegetarian version has all the flavor and nostalgia of the classic, but with a homemade cream sauce and new ingredients like seaweed crisps.

Founder and CEO of the Milk Bar bakeries in New York City, where she creates innovative sweets, Christina is also a judge on MasterChef and MasterChef Junior.

Originally made with just wafer cookies and whipped cream, this no-bake cake was created before electric refrigeration became mainstream. Christina's version has fun and unexpected pantry ingredients like the ones found in her signature compost cookies: potato chips, pretzels, graham crackers, oats, and even coffee.


5 Celebrity Chefs Make Over Our Favorite Comfort Food Dishes

These old favorites taste even better with a modern twist.

We challenged a few of our favorite chefs to make five recipes from WD's archives easier and tastier. Mission accomplished! From a hearty stew to a loaded dessert, you can't go wrong with whipping up one of these transformed dishes.

A best-selling cookbook author, Marcus appears frequently on Chopped and is the head chef and owner of Red Rooster in New York City and London.

This Great Depression dish&mdashalso known as hobo stew&mdashwas originally a mix of meat, potatoes, and whatever other ingredients could be found. Marcus spiced things up by adding poblano peppers, adobo sauce, and fresh ginger. Letting the meat simmer in a slow cooker means no need to babysit a pot for hours.

Sara is the host of the PBS show Sara's Weeknight Meals, currently in its sixth season, and the author of multiple books, including Home Cooking 101.

In the years after World War II, chefs in big cities began putting this simple yet special buttery chicken dish on their menus to attract the recent influx of Russian and Ukrainian immigrants. Sara marinated the chicken to make it extra tender and flavorful, then revamped the flavors by combining the butter with Gorgonzola cheese and pairing the chicken with a creamy buffalo dipping sauce and a crunchy celery salad.

A reporter for the New York Times food section, Melissa writes the popular column "A Good Appetite" and has written nearly 40 cookbooks.

Thanks to Julia Child, French-influenced food was at its height in the 1960 s. This cross between grilled cheese and French toast gained popularity after it debuted at Disneyland. Melissa upgraded from ham and Swiss by using prosciutto, mozzarella, and a lemon-spiked fig jam. Then, instead of dipping it in batter and frying it, she brushed it and baked it for a lighter taste.

Carla is a Top Chef alum, cookbook author, cohost of The Chew, and owner of the restaurant Carla Hall's Southern Kitchen in Brooklyn.

Originally made with canned cream of mushroom soup and topped with potato chips, this casserole was king in the 1950 s, when food was all about convenience. Carla's vegetarian version has all the flavor and nostalgia of the classic, but with a homemade cream sauce and new ingredients like seaweed crisps.

Founder and CEO of the Milk Bar bakeries in New York City, where she creates innovative sweets, Christina is also a judge on MasterChef and MasterChef Junior.

Originally made with just wafer cookies and whipped cream, this no-bake cake was created before electric refrigeration became mainstream. Christina's version has fun and unexpected pantry ingredients like the ones found in her signature compost cookies: potato chips, pretzels, graham crackers, oats, and even coffee.


5 Celebrity Chefs Make Over Our Favorite Comfort Food Dishes

These old favorites taste even better with a modern twist.

We challenged a few of our favorite chefs to make five recipes from WD's archives easier and tastier. Mission accomplished! From a hearty stew to a loaded dessert, you can't go wrong with whipping up one of these transformed dishes.

A best-selling cookbook author, Marcus appears frequently on Chopped and is the head chef and owner of Red Rooster in New York City and London.

This Great Depression dish&mdashalso known as hobo stew&mdashwas originally a mix of meat, potatoes, and whatever other ingredients could be found. Marcus spiced things up by adding poblano peppers, adobo sauce, and fresh ginger. Letting the meat simmer in a slow cooker means no need to babysit a pot for hours.

Sara is the host of the PBS show Sara's Weeknight Meals, currently in its sixth season, and the author of multiple books, including Home Cooking 101.

In the years after World War II, chefs in big cities began putting this simple yet special buttery chicken dish on their menus to attract the recent influx of Russian and Ukrainian immigrants. Sara marinated the chicken to make it extra tender and flavorful, then revamped the flavors by combining the butter with Gorgonzola cheese and pairing the chicken with a creamy buffalo dipping sauce and a crunchy celery salad.

A reporter for the New York Times food section, Melissa writes the popular column "A Good Appetite" and has written nearly 40 cookbooks.

Thanks to Julia Child, French-influenced food was at its height in the 1960 s. This cross between grilled cheese and French toast gained popularity after it debuted at Disneyland. Melissa upgraded from ham and Swiss by using prosciutto, mozzarella, and a lemon-spiked fig jam. Then, instead of dipping it in batter and frying it, she brushed it and baked it for a lighter taste.

Carla is a Top Chef alum, cookbook author, cohost of The Chew, and owner of the restaurant Carla Hall's Southern Kitchen in Brooklyn.

Originally made with canned cream of mushroom soup and topped with potato chips, this casserole was king in the 1950 s, when food was all about convenience. Carla's vegetarian version has all the flavor and nostalgia of the classic, but with a homemade cream sauce and new ingredients like seaweed crisps.

Founder and CEO of the Milk Bar bakeries in New York City, where she creates innovative sweets, Christina is also a judge on MasterChef and MasterChef Junior.

Originally made with just wafer cookies and whipped cream, this no-bake cake was created before electric refrigeration became mainstream. Christina's version has fun and unexpected pantry ingredients like the ones found in her signature compost cookies: potato chips, pretzels, graham crackers, oats, and even coffee.


5 Celebrity Chefs Make Over Our Favorite Comfort Food Dishes

These old favorites taste even better with a modern twist.

We challenged a few of our favorite chefs to make five recipes from WD's archives easier and tastier. Mission accomplished! From a hearty stew to a loaded dessert, you can't go wrong with whipping up one of these transformed dishes.

A best-selling cookbook author, Marcus appears frequently on Chopped and is the head chef and owner of Red Rooster in New York City and London.

This Great Depression dish&mdashalso known as hobo stew&mdashwas originally a mix of meat, potatoes, and whatever other ingredients could be found. Marcus spiced things up by adding poblano peppers, adobo sauce, and fresh ginger. Letting the meat simmer in a slow cooker means no need to babysit a pot for hours.

Sara is the host of the PBS show Sara's Weeknight Meals, currently in its sixth season, and the author of multiple books, including Home Cooking 101.

In the years after World War II, chefs in big cities began putting this simple yet special buttery chicken dish on their menus to attract the recent influx of Russian and Ukrainian immigrants. Sara marinated the chicken to make it extra tender and flavorful, then revamped the flavors by combining the butter with Gorgonzola cheese and pairing the chicken with a creamy buffalo dipping sauce and a crunchy celery salad.

A reporter for the New York Times food section, Melissa writes the popular column "A Good Appetite" and has written nearly 40 cookbooks.

Thanks to Julia Child, French-influenced food was at its height in the 1960 s. This cross between grilled cheese and French toast gained popularity after it debuted at Disneyland. Melissa upgraded from ham and Swiss by using prosciutto, mozzarella, and a lemon-spiked fig jam. Then, instead of dipping it in batter and frying it, she brushed it and baked it for a lighter taste.

Carla is a Top Chef alum, cookbook author, cohost of The Chew, and owner of the restaurant Carla Hall's Southern Kitchen in Brooklyn.

Originally made with canned cream of mushroom soup and topped with potato chips, this casserole was king in the 1950 s, when food was all about convenience. Carla's vegetarian version has all the flavor and nostalgia of the classic, but with a homemade cream sauce and new ingredients like seaweed crisps.

Founder and CEO of the Milk Bar bakeries in New York City, where she creates innovative sweets, Christina is also a judge on MasterChef and MasterChef Junior.

Originally made with just wafer cookies and whipped cream, this no-bake cake was created before electric refrigeration became mainstream. Christina's version has fun and unexpected pantry ingredients like the ones found in her signature compost cookies: potato chips, pretzels, graham crackers, oats, and even coffee.


5 Celebrity Chefs Make Over Our Favorite Comfort Food Dishes

These old favorites taste even better with a modern twist.

We challenged a few of our favorite chefs to make five recipes from WD's archives easier and tastier. Mission accomplished! From a hearty stew to a loaded dessert, you can't go wrong with whipping up one of these transformed dishes.

A best-selling cookbook author, Marcus appears frequently on Chopped and is the head chef and owner of Red Rooster in New York City and London.

This Great Depression dish&mdashalso known as hobo stew&mdashwas originally a mix of meat, potatoes, and whatever other ingredients could be found. Marcus spiced things up by adding poblano peppers, adobo sauce, and fresh ginger. Letting the meat simmer in a slow cooker means no need to babysit a pot for hours.

Sara is the host of the PBS show Sara's Weeknight Meals, currently in its sixth season, and the author of multiple books, including Home Cooking 101.

In the years after World War II, chefs in big cities began putting this simple yet special buttery chicken dish on their menus to attract the recent influx of Russian and Ukrainian immigrants. Sara marinated the chicken to make it extra tender and flavorful, then revamped the flavors by combining the butter with Gorgonzola cheese and pairing the chicken with a creamy buffalo dipping sauce and a crunchy celery salad.

A reporter for the New York Times food section, Melissa writes the popular column "A Good Appetite" and has written nearly 40 cookbooks.

Thanks to Julia Child, French-influenced food was at its height in the 1960 s. This cross between grilled cheese and French toast gained popularity after it debuted at Disneyland. Melissa upgraded from ham and Swiss by using prosciutto, mozzarella, and a lemon-spiked fig jam. Then, instead of dipping it in batter and frying it, she brushed it and baked it for a lighter taste.

Carla is a Top Chef alum, cookbook author, cohost of The Chew, and owner of the restaurant Carla Hall's Southern Kitchen in Brooklyn.

Originally made with canned cream of mushroom soup and topped with potato chips, this casserole was king in the 1950 s, when food was all about convenience. Carla's vegetarian version has all the flavor and nostalgia of the classic, but with a homemade cream sauce and new ingredients like seaweed crisps.

Founder and CEO of the Milk Bar bakeries in New York City, where she creates innovative sweets, Christina is also a judge on MasterChef and MasterChef Junior.

Originally made with just wafer cookies and whipped cream, this no-bake cake was created before electric refrigeration became mainstream. Christina's version has fun and unexpected pantry ingredients like the ones found in her signature compost cookies: potato chips, pretzels, graham crackers, oats, and even coffee.


5 Celebrity Chefs Make Over Our Favorite Comfort Food Dishes

These old favorites taste even better with a modern twist.

We challenged a few of our favorite chefs to make five recipes from WD's archives easier and tastier. Mission accomplished! From a hearty stew to a loaded dessert, you can't go wrong with whipping up one of these transformed dishes.

A best-selling cookbook author, Marcus appears frequently on Chopped and is the head chef and owner of Red Rooster in New York City and London.

This Great Depression dish&mdashalso known as hobo stew&mdashwas originally a mix of meat, potatoes, and whatever other ingredients could be found. Marcus spiced things up by adding poblano peppers, adobo sauce, and fresh ginger. Letting the meat simmer in a slow cooker means no need to babysit a pot for hours.

Sara is the host of the PBS show Sara's Weeknight Meals, currently in its sixth season, and the author of multiple books, including Home Cooking 101.

In the years after World War II, chefs in big cities began putting this simple yet special buttery chicken dish on their menus to attract the recent influx of Russian and Ukrainian immigrants. Sara marinated the chicken to make it extra tender and flavorful, then revamped the flavors by combining the butter with Gorgonzola cheese and pairing the chicken with a creamy buffalo dipping sauce and a crunchy celery salad.

A reporter for the New York Times food section, Melissa writes the popular column "A Good Appetite" and has written nearly 40 cookbooks.

Thanks to Julia Child, French-influenced food was at its height in the 1960 s. This cross between grilled cheese and French toast gained popularity after it debuted at Disneyland. Melissa upgraded from ham and Swiss by using prosciutto, mozzarella, and a lemon-spiked fig jam. Then, instead of dipping it in batter and frying it, she brushed it and baked it for a lighter taste.

Carla is a Top Chef alum, cookbook author, cohost of The Chew, and owner of the restaurant Carla Hall's Southern Kitchen in Brooklyn.

Originally made with canned cream of mushroom soup and topped with potato chips, this casserole was king in the 1950 s, when food was all about convenience. Carla's vegetarian version has all the flavor and nostalgia of the classic, but with a homemade cream sauce and new ingredients like seaweed crisps.

Founder and CEO of the Milk Bar bakeries in New York City, where she creates innovative sweets, Christina is also a judge on MasterChef and MasterChef Junior.

Originally made with just wafer cookies and whipped cream, this no-bake cake was created before electric refrigeration became mainstream. Christina's version has fun and unexpected pantry ingredients like the ones found in her signature compost cookies: potato chips, pretzels, graham crackers, oats, and even coffee.


5 Celebrity Chefs Make Over Our Favorite Comfort Food Dishes

These old favorites taste even better with a modern twist.

We challenged a few of our favorite chefs to make five recipes from WD's archives easier and tastier. Mission accomplished! From a hearty stew to a loaded dessert, you can't go wrong with whipping up one of these transformed dishes.

A best-selling cookbook author, Marcus appears frequently on Chopped and is the head chef and owner of Red Rooster in New York City and London.

This Great Depression dish&mdashalso known as hobo stew&mdashwas originally a mix of meat, potatoes, and whatever other ingredients could be found. Marcus spiced things up by adding poblano peppers, adobo sauce, and fresh ginger. Letting the meat simmer in a slow cooker means no need to babysit a pot for hours.

Sara is the host of the PBS show Sara's Weeknight Meals, currently in its sixth season, and the author of multiple books, including Home Cooking 101.

In the years after World War II, chefs in big cities began putting this simple yet special buttery chicken dish on their menus to attract the recent influx of Russian and Ukrainian immigrants. Sara marinated the chicken to make it extra tender and flavorful, then revamped the flavors by combining the butter with Gorgonzola cheese and pairing the chicken with a creamy buffalo dipping sauce and a crunchy celery salad.

A reporter for the New York Times food section, Melissa writes the popular column "A Good Appetite" and has written nearly 40 cookbooks.

Thanks to Julia Child, French-influenced food was at its height in the 1960 s. This cross between grilled cheese and French toast gained popularity after it debuted at Disneyland. Melissa upgraded from ham and Swiss by using prosciutto, mozzarella, and a lemon-spiked fig jam. Then, instead of dipping it in batter and frying it, she brushed it and baked it for a lighter taste.

Carla is a Top Chef alum, cookbook author, cohost of The Chew, and owner of the restaurant Carla Hall's Southern Kitchen in Brooklyn.

Originally made with canned cream of mushroom soup and topped with potato chips, this casserole was king in the 1950 s, when food was all about convenience. Carla's vegetarian version has all the flavor and nostalgia of the classic, but with a homemade cream sauce and new ingredients like seaweed crisps.

Founder and CEO of the Milk Bar bakeries in New York City, where she creates innovative sweets, Christina is also a judge on MasterChef and MasterChef Junior.

Originally made with just wafer cookies and whipped cream, this no-bake cake was created before electric refrigeration became mainstream. Christina's version has fun and unexpected pantry ingredients like the ones found in her signature compost cookies: potato chips, pretzels, graham crackers, oats, and even coffee.


Watch the video: Mister Rogers Remixed. Garden of Your Mind. PBS Digital Studios (July 2022).


Comments:

  1. Angell

    I think this is the admirable idea

  2. Meztile

    You are not the expert, coincidentally?

  3. Asim

    I recommend searching on google.com



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