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Solar Roadways Set to Move From Prototype to Production Thanks to Some Famous Fans

Solar Roadways Set to Move From Prototype to Production Thanks to Some Famous Fans


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Thanks so some major celebrity support, like Nathan Fillion and George Takei (both of whom took to Facebook and Twitter), Solar Roadways has raised enough to meet their Indiegogo goal of $1 million (to date, they've made $1.4 million) and we couldn't be more thrilled. The concept is pretty much perfect and proposes replacing useless asphalt roads and parking lots with solar panels. The panel would generate three times more energy than we actually consume, which would essentially solve all of our problems. While Solar Roadways would take a lot more than just a successful crowd funding campaign to be implemented nationwide, it's a major step in the right direction.

Created by husband and wife team, Scott and Julie Brusaw of Idaho, the project has been in development since the mid-2000s and is actually pretty simple. Solar Roadways wants to cover driving surfaces (and by extension, any surface we walk on) with durable solar panels that have multiple uses and basically turn roads into "smart" tech. The panels can withstand the weight of 250,000-pound trucks and will be able to "pay for themselves" by generating clean renewable energy for homes and businesses.

The panels are packed with features, like a heating element that will make roads safer by keeping them free of snow and ice. LED lights are installed for road lines and can be dimmed or turned off if there aren't any cars on the road. The company envisions "activating the LEDs 1/2 mile ahead and 1/4 mile behind a vehicle. If you were to see the adjacent lane lighting up, then you'd know an oncoming vehicle is 1/2 mile ahead."

Even cooler is that the system will be able to recognize weight so that if a pedestrian or animal steps onto the road, the panels will blink or read "SLOW DOWN" to alert a driver of a possible impact.

Two different types have been designed with the help of civil engineers, one with a semi-smooth walking surface and one with the raised hexagons for highway use. Solar Roadways promises that the glass covering won't be slippery and have been tested with trucks, cars, motorcycles, and bikes. They also assert that preexisting roads wouldn't need to be torn up for the new panels, instead they would be used as a solid foundation.

According to the company, "over $160 billion is lost each year [in the U.S.] in lost productivity from people sitting in traffic due to road maintenance." They promise that their modular system will be super fast and easy to repair, especially when compared to our current asphalt system. "Each of the panels contain their own microprocessor, which communicates wirelessly with surrounding panels. If one of them should become damaged and stop communicating, then the rest of the panels can report the problem." Plus, since each one weighs 110 pounds, one person can make the switch from a broken panel to a good one.

Sure, the campaign's goal isn't nearly enough to fund the project nationwide (that number would be more like $56 trillion, according to Aaron Saenz of SingularityHUB), but it would allow the team hire additional engineers to help make tweaks in the product and streamline the process so they can go from prototype to production. Since they've met their goal, they've asked for resumes on their Facebook page, so if you want to help out and have the necessary schooling, send your skills over. They will begin hiring in June and are currently looking for office space in Sandpoint, Idaho.

The campaign ends on May 31, so if you still want to help them, you can donate and get some perks — like your name on a parking lot for $500 or a seven-inch hexagon for $10,000.


Game Mod

Just because the game designers made a good game doesn't mean you can't make it even better. Or at least different.

Game modifications, or "mods" for short, are any alterations to a game that were not made by the game's license holder. They can be unofficial Expansion Packs (new maps or new equipment in the same game), completely unrelated games that merely use the source game's software as a backbone ("total conversions"), or just quality-of-life adjustments to the original, such as Fan Translations, bug fixes, character Cameo appearances (which can often lead to Ninja Pirate Zombie Robot scenarios), or House Rules. (Or, if the game includes any attractive women or men, nude patches.)

Some games are deliberately designed to be easy to modify, including a "construction set" of sorts to build levels, weapons, etc., and whole modding communities spring up as a result. However, some types of mods are discouraged, or even cracked down on, for good reason: If it's a multiplayer game, a mod in the hands of a player but not their opponent usually means an unfair advantage. (Some God Modders will use these anyway and hope they aren't caught.) That's why multiplayer games are usually exempt from mods or, if running on a modular engine, deliberately designed to be hard to mod (example is that most online multiplayer of any Source engine games has a "Pure" server settings which disables any mods including texture replacements).

A few mods take advantage of content that was programmed into the game in the early stages, then scrapped from the final design. Unless space is a big issue, the programmers usually leave all this content Dummied Out in the game's code. This leaves an opening for a modder to re-introduce an access point and enjoy the missing content. albeit at their own risk, since it's usually unfinished and untested. A safer and more generally successful approach is to overhaul the graphics. PC hardware becomes more advanced over time, making it capable of handling more detailed graphics this helps keep an older game looking new and fresh and thus helping to keep it alive among the community, as well as helping to prevent the game from being overwhelmed by current-gen games.

It's much easier to mod a computer game than a hard-coded console game, but creative adjustments to a save file (and, with the most recent generation of games, console hard drive content) and/or use of a GameShark allow determined amateur programmers to mod with the best of them. Most often, however, mods of console games are edits of the ROM files used in Emulation. These tend to be referred to as "ROM hacks" and are usually considered a separate scene from mods, as running a mod is intended behavior of the original software especially in the case of games that offer an official avenue for modding, or alternatively, as mods are designed for games on open platforms such as the IBM Personal Computer and Apple Macintosh, while playing a ROM hack requires patching the game's binaries (or performing some other kind of hack) and copying said binaries to a flash cart or burned to a disc note And in the case of more recent systems, performing some kind of modification to the consoles for them to run unsigned or modified code .

Early ROM hacks were largely present in Famiclone consoles and cartridges, especially where the said system wasn't officially released. Cartridges contained graphics hacks very often. The most common ones were those where the main character was replaced by Mario, passing them off as an "installment" in the Mario series such as in the case of the now-infamous 7 Grand Dad.

Unfortunately, ROM hacks are probably the biggest offender of Sturgeon's Law. In the mid-oughts, a great many ROM hacks consisted of little else but tons of offensive and poorly drawn graphic hacks like profanity-laden graffiti, buckets of Gorn, nudity, and outright pornography, and (just to offend anybody who wasn't offended yet) swastikas, racial slurs, and pro-KKK propaganda. Most modding communities have very little moderation or quality control, save for a few that went on Quality by Popular Vote. In addition, redundancy is a bit of a problem as well &mdash a lot of mods might accomplish similar things.

As mentioned earlier, computer games are much easier to modify than console games. As such, PC gamers will often list mods as a reason why PC games are clearly superior to their console counterparts, despite the aforementioned Sturgeon's Law.

Some of these even have their own work pages on this Wiki see Game Mod Index.


Game Mod

Just because the game designers made a good game doesn't mean you can't make it even better. Or at least different.

Game modifications, or "mods" for short, are any alterations to a game that were not made by the game's license holder. They can be unofficial Expansion Packs (new maps or new equipment in the same game), completely unrelated games that merely use the source game's software as a backbone ("total conversions"), or just quality-of-life adjustments to the original, such as Fan Translations, bug fixes, character Cameo appearances (which can often lead to Ninja Pirate Zombie Robot scenarios), or House Rules. (Or, if the game includes any attractive women or men, nude patches.)

Some games are deliberately designed to be easy to modify, including a "construction set" of sorts to build levels, weapons, etc., and whole modding communities spring up as a result. However, some types of mods are discouraged, or even cracked down on, for good reason: If it's a multiplayer game, a mod in the hands of a player but not their opponent usually means an unfair advantage. (Some God Modders will use these anyway and hope they aren't caught.) That's why multiplayer games are usually exempt from mods or, if running on a modular engine, deliberately designed to be hard to mod (example is that most online multiplayer of any Source engine games has a "Pure" server settings which disables any mods including texture replacements).

A few mods take advantage of content that was programmed into the game in the early stages, then scrapped from the final design. Unless space is a big issue, the programmers usually leave all this content Dummied Out in the game's code. This leaves an opening for a modder to re-introduce an access point and enjoy the missing content. albeit at their own risk, since it's usually unfinished and untested. A safer and more generally successful approach is to overhaul the graphics. PC hardware becomes more advanced over time, making it capable of handling more detailed graphics this helps keep an older game looking new and fresh and thus helping to keep it alive among the community, as well as helping to prevent the game from being overwhelmed by current-gen games.

It's much easier to mod a computer game than a hard-coded console game, but creative adjustments to a save file (and, with the most recent generation of games, console hard drive content) and/or use of a GameShark allow determined amateur programmers to mod with the best of them. Most often, however, mods of console games are edits of the ROM files used in Emulation. These tend to be referred to as "ROM hacks" and are usually considered a separate scene from mods, as running a mod is intended behavior of the original software especially in the case of games that offer an official avenue for modding, or alternatively, as mods are designed for games on open platforms such as the IBM Personal Computer and Apple Macintosh, while playing a ROM hack requires patching the game's binaries (or performing some other kind of hack) and copying said binaries to a flash cart or burned to a disc note And in the case of more recent systems, performing some kind of modification to the consoles for them to run unsigned or modified code .

Early ROM hacks were largely present in Famiclone consoles and cartridges, especially where the said system wasn't officially released. Cartridges contained graphics hacks very often. The most common ones were those where the main character was replaced by Mario, passing them off as an "installment" in the Mario series such as in the case of the now-infamous 7 Grand Dad.

Unfortunately, ROM hacks are probably the biggest offender of Sturgeon's Law. In the mid-oughts, a great many ROM hacks consisted of little else but tons of offensive and poorly drawn graphic hacks like profanity-laden graffiti, buckets of Gorn, nudity, and outright pornography, and (just to offend anybody who wasn't offended yet) swastikas, racial slurs, and pro-KKK propaganda. Most modding communities have very little moderation or quality control, save for a few that went on Quality by Popular Vote. In addition, redundancy is a bit of a problem as well &mdash a lot of mods might accomplish similar things.

As mentioned earlier, computer games are much easier to modify than console games. As such, PC gamers will often list mods as a reason why PC games are clearly superior to their console counterparts, despite the aforementioned Sturgeon's Law.

Some of these even have their own work pages on this Wiki see Game Mod Index.


Game Mod

Just because the game designers made a good game doesn't mean you can't make it even better. Or at least different.

Game modifications, or "mods" for short, are any alterations to a game that were not made by the game's license holder. They can be unofficial Expansion Packs (new maps or new equipment in the same game), completely unrelated games that merely use the source game's software as a backbone ("total conversions"), or just quality-of-life adjustments to the original, such as Fan Translations, bug fixes, character Cameo appearances (which can often lead to Ninja Pirate Zombie Robot scenarios), or House Rules. (Or, if the game includes any attractive women or men, nude patches.)

Some games are deliberately designed to be easy to modify, including a "construction set" of sorts to build levels, weapons, etc., and whole modding communities spring up as a result. However, some types of mods are discouraged, or even cracked down on, for good reason: If it's a multiplayer game, a mod in the hands of a player but not their opponent usually means an unfair advantage. (Some God Modders will use these anyway and hope they aren't caught.) That's why multiplayer games are usually exempt from mods or, if running on a modular engine, deliberately designed to be hard to mod (example is that most online multiplayer of any Source engine games has a "Pure" server settings which disables any mods including texture replacements).

A few mods take advantage of content that was programmed into the game in the early stages, then scrapped from the final design. Unless space is a big issue, the programmers usually leave all this content Dummied Out in the game's code. This leaves an opening for a modder to re-introduce an access point and enjoy the missing content. albeit at their own risk, since it's usually unfinished and untested. A safer and more generally successful approach is to overhaul the graphics. PC hardware becomes more advanced over time, making it capable of handling more detailed graphics this helps keep an older game looking new and fresh and thus helping to keep it alive among the community, as well as helping to prevent the game from being overwhelmed by current-gen games.

It's much easier to mod a computer game than a hard-coded console game, but creative adjustments to a save file (and, with the most recent generation of games, console hard drive content) and/or use of a GameShark allow determined amateur programmers to mod with the best of them. Most often, however, mods of console games are edits of the ROM files used in Emulation. These tend to be referred to as "ROM hacks" and are usually considered a separate scene from mods, as running a mod is intended behavior of the original software especially in the case of games that offer an official avenue for modding, or alternatively, as mods are designed for games on open platforms such as the IBM Personal Computer and Apple Macintosh, while playing a ROM hack requires patching the game's binaries (or performing some other kind of hack) and copying said binaries to a flash cart or burned to a disc note And in the case of more recent systems, performing some kind of modification to the consoles for them to run unsigned or modified code .

Early ROM hacks were largely present in Famiclone consoles and cartridges, especially where the said system wasn't officially released. Cartridges contained graphics hacks very often. The most common ones were those where the main character was replaced by Mario, passing them off as an "installment" in the Mario series such as in the case of the now-infamous 7 Grand Dad.

Unfortunately, ROM hacks are probably the biggest offender of Sturgeon's Law. In the mid-oughts, a great many ROM hacks consisted of little else but tons of offensive and poorly drawn graphic hacks like profanity-laden graffiti, buckets of Gorn, nudity, and outright pornography, and (just to offend anybody who wasn't offended yet) swastikas, racial slurs, and pro-KKK propaganda. Most modding communities have very little moderation or quality control, save for a few that went on Quality by Popular Vote. In addition, redundancy is a bit of a problem as well &mdash a lot of mods might accomplish similar things.

As mentioned earlier, computer games are much easier to modify than console games. As such, PC gamers will often list mods as a reason why PC games are clearly superior to their console counterparts, despite the aforementioned Sturgeon's Law.

Some of these even have their own work pages on this Wiki see Game Mod Index.


Game Mod

Just because the game designers made a good game doesn't mean you can't make it even better. Or at least different.

Game modifications, or "mods" for short, are any alterations to a game that were not made by the game's license holder. They can be unofficial Expansion Packs (new maps or new equipment in the same game), completely unrelated games that merely use the source game's software as a backbone ("total conversions"), or just quality-of-life adjustments to the original, such as Fan Translations, bug fixes, character Cameo appearances (which can often lead to Ninja Pirate Zombie Robot scenarios), or House Rules. (Or, if the game includes any attractive women or men, nude patches.)

Some games are deliberately designed to be easy to modify, including a "construction set" of sorts to build levels, weapons, etc., and whole modding communities spring up as a result. However, some types of mods are discouraged, or even cracked down on, for good reason: If it's a multiplayer game, a mod in the hands of a player but not their opponent usually means an unfair advantage. (Some God Modders will use these anyway and hope they aren't caught.) That's why multiplayer games are usually exempt from mods or, if running on a modular engine, deliberately designed to be hard to mod (example is that most online multiplayer of any Source engine games has a "Pure" server settings which disables any mods including texture replacements).

A few mods take advantage of content that was programmed into the game in the early stages, then scrapped from the final design. Unless space is a big issue, the programmers usually leave all this content Dummied Out in the game's code. This leaves an opening for a modder to re-introduce an access point and enjoy the missing content. albeit at their own risk, since it's usually unfinished and untested. A safer and more generally successful approach is to overhaul the graphics. PC hardware becomes more advanced over time, making it capable of handling more detailed graphics this helps keep an older game looking new and fresh and thus helping to keep it alive among the community, as well as helping to prevent the game from being overwhelmed by current-gen games.

It's much easier to mod a computer game than a hard-coded console game, but creative adjustments to a save file (and, with the most recent generation of games, console hard drive content) and/or use of a GameShark allow determined amateur programmers to mod with the best of them. Most often, however, mods of console games are edits of the ROM files used in Emulation. These tend to be referred to as "ROM hacks" and are usually considered a separate scene from mods, as running a mod is intended behavior of the original software especially in the case of games that offer an official avenue for modding, or alternatively, as mods are designed for games on open platforms such as the IBM Personal Computer and Apple Macintosh, while playing a ROM hack requires patching the game's binaries (or performing some other kind of hack) and copying said binaries to a flash cart or burned to a disc note And in the case of more recent systems, performing some kind of modification to the consoles for them to run unsigned or modified code .

Early ROM hacks were largely present in Famiclone consoles and cartridges, especially where the said system wasn't officially released. Cartridges contained graphics hacks very often. The most common ones were those where the main character was replaced by Mario, passing them off as an "installment" in the Mario series such as in the case of the now-infamous 7 Grand Dad.

Unfortunately, ROM hacks are probably the biggest offender of Sturgeon's Law. In the mid-oughts, a great many ROM hacks consisted of little else but tons of offensive and poorly drawn graphic hacks like profanity-laden graffiti, buckets of Gorn, nudity, and outright pornography, and (just to offend anybody who wasn't offended yet) swastikas, racial slurs, and pro-KKK propaganda. Most modding communities have very little moderation or quality control, save for a few that went on Quality by Popular Vote. In addition, redundancy is a bit of a problem as well &mdash a lot of mods might accomplish similar things.

As mentioned earlier, computer games are much easier to modify than console games. As such, PC gamers will often list mods as a reason why PC games are clearly superior to their console counterparts, despite the aforementioned Sturgeon's Law.

Some of these even have their own work pages on this Wiki see Game Mod Index.


Game Mod

Just because the game designers made a good game doesn't mean you can't make it even better. Or at least different.

Game modifications, or "mods" for short, are any alterations to a game that were not made by the game's license holder. They can be unofficial Expansion Packs (new maps or new equipment in the same game), completely unrelated games that merely use the source game's software as a backbone ("total conversions"), or just quality-of-life adjustments to the original, such as Fan Translations, bug fixes, character Cameo appearances (which can often lead to Ninja Pirate Zombie Robot scenarios), or House Rules. (Or, if the game includes any attractive women or men, nude patches.)

Some games are deliberately designed to be easy to modify, including a "construction set" of sorts to build levels, weapons, etc., and whole modding communities spring up as a result. However, some types of mods are discouraged, or even cracked down on, for good reason: If it's a multiplayer game, a mod in the hands of a player but not their opponent usually means an unfair advantage. (Some God Modders will use these anyway and hope they aren't caught.) That's why multiplayer games are usually exempt from mods or, if running on a modular engine, deliberately designed to be hard to mod (example is that most online multiplayer of any Source engine games has a "Pure" server settings which disables any mods including texture replacements).

A few mods take advantage of content that was programmed into the game in the early stages, then scrapped from the final design. Unless space is a big issue, the programmers usually leave all this content Dummied Out in the game's code. This leaves an opening for a modder to re-introduce an access point and enjoy the missing content. albeit at their own risk, since it's usually unfinished and untested. A safer and more generally successful approach is to overhaul the graphics. PC hardware becomes more advanced over time, making it capable of handling more detailed graphics this helps keep an older game looking new and fresh and thus helping to keep it alive among the community, as well as helping to prevent the game from being overwhelmed by current-gen games.

It's much easier to mod a computer game than a hard-coded console game, but creative adjustments to a save file (and, with the most recent generation of games, console hard drive content) and/or use of a GameShark allow determined amateur programmers to mod with the best of them. Most often, however, mods of console games are edits of the ROM files used in Emulation. These tend to be referred to as "ROM hacks" and are usually considered a separate scene from mods, as running a mod is intended behavior of the original software especially in the case of games that offer an official avenue for modding, or alternatively, as mods are designed for games on open platforms such as the IBM Personal Computer and Apple Macintosh, while playing a ROM hack requires patching the game's binaries (or performing some other kind of hack) and copying said binaries to a flash cart or burned to a disc note And in the case of more recent systems, performing some kind of modification to the consoles for them to run unsigned or modified code .

Early ROM hacks were largely present in Famiclone consoles and cartridges, especially where the said system wasn't officially released. Cartridges contained graphics hacks very often. The most common ones were those where the main character was replaced by Mario, passing them off as an "installment" in the Mario series such as in the case of the now-infamous 7 Grand Dad.

Unfortunately, ROM hacks are probably the biggest offender of Sturgeon's Law. In the mid-oughts, a great many ROM hacks consisted of little else but tons of offensive and poorly drawn graphic hacks like profanity-laden graffiti, buckets of Gorn, nudity, and outright pornography, and (just to offend anybody who wasn't offended yet) swastikas, racial slurs, and pro-KKK propaganda. Most modding communities have very little moderation or quality control, save for a few that went on Quality by Popular Vote. In addition, redundancy is a bit of a problem as well &mdash a lot of mods might accomplish similar things.

As mentioned earlier, computer games are much easier to modify than console games. As such, PC gamers will often list mods as a reason why PC games are clearly superior to their console counterparts, despite the aforementioned Sturgeon's Law.

Some of these even have their own work pages on this Wiki see Game Mod Index.


Game Mod

Just because the game designers made a good game doesn't mean you can't make it even better. Or at least different.

Game modifications, or "mods" for short, are any alterations to a game that were not made by the game's license holder. They can be unofficial Expansion Packs (new maps or new equipment in the same game), completely unrelated games that merely use the source game's software as a backbone ("total conversions"), or just quality-of-life adjustments to the original, such as Fan Translations, bug fixes, character Cameo appearances (which can often lead to Ninja Pirate Zombie Robot scenarios), or House Rules. (Or, if the game includes any attractive women or men, nude patches.)

Some games are deliberately designed to be easy to modify, including a "construction set" of sorts to build levels, weapons, etc., and whole modding communities spring up as a result. However, some types of mods are discouraged, or even cracked down on, for good reason: If it's a multiplayer game, a mod in the hands of a player but not their opponent usually means an unfair advantage. (Some God Modders will use these anyway and hope they aren't caught.) That's why multiplayer games are usually exempt from mods or, if running on a modular engine, deliberately designed to be hard to mod (example is that most online multiplayer of any Source engine games has a "Pure" server settings which disables any mods including texture replacements).

A few mods take advantage of content that was programmed into the game in the early stages, then scrapped from the final design. Unless space is a big issue, the programmers usually leave all this content Dummied Out in the game's code. This leaves an opening for a modder to re-introduce an access point and enjoy the missing content. albeit at their own risk, since it's usually unfinished and untested. A safer and more generally successful approach is to overhaul the graphics. PC hardware becomes more advanced over time, making it capable of handling more detailed graphics this helps keep an older game looking new and fresh and thus helping to keep it alive among the community, as well as helping to prevent the game from being overwhelmed by current-gen games.

It's much easier to mod a computer game than a hard-coded console game, but creative adjustments to a save file (and, with the most recent generation of games, console hard drive content) and/or use of a GameShark allow determined amateur programmers to mod with the best of them. Most often, however, mods of console games are edits of the ROM files used in Emulation. These tend to be referred to as "ROM hacks" and are usually considered a separate scene from mods, as running a mod is intended behavior of the original software especially in the case of games that offer an official avenue for modding, or alternatively, as mods are designed for games on open platforms such as the IBM Personal Computer and Apple Macintosh, while playing a ROM hack requires patching the game's binaries (or performing some other kind of hack) and copying said binaries to a flash cart or burned to a disc note And in the case of more recent systems, performing some kind of modification to the consoles for them to run unsigned or modified code .

Early ROM hacks were largely present in Famiclone consoles and cartridges, especially where the said system wasn't officially released. Cartridges contained graphics hacks very often. The most common ones were those where the main character was replaced by Mario, passing them off as an "installment" in the Mario series such as in the case of the now-infamous 7 Grand Dad.

Unfortunately, ROM hacks are probably the biggest offender of Sturgeon's Law. In the mid-oughts, a great many ROM hacks consisted of little else but tons of offensive and poorly drawn graphic hacks like profanity-laden graffiti, buckets of Gorn, nudity, and outright pornography, and (just to offend anybody who wasn't offended yet) swastikas, racial slurs, and pro-KKK propaganda. Most modding communities have very little moderation or quality control, save for a few that went on Quality by Popular Vote. In addition, redundancy is a bit of a problem as well &mdash a lot of mods might accomplish similar things.

As mentioned earlier, computer games are much easier to modify than console games. As such, PC gamers will often list mods as a reason why PC games are clearly superior to their console counterparts, despite the aforementioned Sturgeon's Law.

Some of these even have their own work pages on this Wiki see Game Mod Index.


Game Mod

Just because the game designers made a good game doesn't mean you can't make it even better. Or at least different.

Game modifications, or "mods" for short, are any alterations to a game that were not made by the game's license holder. They can be unofficial Expansion Packs (new maps or new equipment in the same game), completely unrelated games that merely use the source game's software as a backbone ("total conversions"), or just quality-of-life adjustments to the original, such as Fan Translations, bug fixes, character Cameo appearances (which can often lead to Ninja Pirate Zombie Robot scenarios), or House Rules. (Or, if the game includes any attractive women or men, nude patches.)

Some games are deliberately designed to be easy to modify, including a "construction set" of sorts to build levels, weapons, etc., and whole modding communities spring up as a result. However, some types of mods are discouraged, or even cracked down on, for good reason: If it's a multiplayer game, a mod in the hands of a player but not their opponent usually means an unfair advantage. (Some God Modders will use these anyway and hope they aren't caught.) That's why multiplayer games are usually exempt from mods or, if running on a modular engine, deliberately designed to be hard to mod (example is that most online multiplayer of any Source engine games has a "Pure" server settings which disables any mods including texture replacements).

A few mods take advantage of content that was programmed into the game in the early stages, then scrapped from the final design. Unless space is a big issue, the programmers usually leave all this content Dummied Out in the game's code. This leaves an opening for a modder to re-introduce an access point and enjoy the missing content. albeit at their own risk, since it's usually unfinished and untested. A safer and more generally successful approach is to overhaul the graphics. PC hardware becomes more advanced over time, making it capable of handling more detailed graphics this helps keep an older game looking new and fresh and thus helping to keep it alive among the community, as well as helping to prevent the game from being overwhelmed by current-gen games.

It's much easier to mod a computer game than a hard-coded console game, but creative adjustments to a save file (and, with the most recent generation of games, console hard drive content) and/or use of a GameShark allow determined amateur programmers to mod with the best of them. Most often, however, mods of console games are edits of the ROM files used in Emulation. These tend to be referred to as "ROM hacks" and are usually considered a separate scene from mods, as running a mod is intended behavior of the original software especially in the case of games that offer an official avenue for modding, or alternatively, as mods are designed for games on open platforms such as the IBM Personal Computer and Apple Macintosh, while playing a ROM hack requires patching the game's binaries (or performing some other kind of hack) and copying said binaries to a flash cart or burned to a disc note And in the case of more recent systems, performing some kind of modification to the consoles for them to run unsigned or modified code .

Early ROM hacks were largely present in Famiclone consoles and cartridges, especially where the said system wasn't officially released. Cartridges contained graphics hacks very often. The most common ones were those where the main character was replaced by Mario, passing them off as an "installment" in the Mario series such as in the case of the now-infamous 7 Grand Dad.

Unfortunately, ROM hacks are probably the biggest offender of Sturgeon's Law. In the mid-oughts, a great many ROM hacks consisted of little else but tons of offensive and poorly drawn graphic hacks like profanity-laden graffiti, buckets of Gorn, nudity, and outright pornography, and (just to offend anybody who wasn't offended yet) swastikas, racial slurs, and pro-KKK propaganda. Most modding communities have very little moderation or quality control, save for a few that went on Quality by Popular Vote. In addition, redundancy is a bit of a problem as well &mdash a lot of mods might accomplish similar things.

As mentioned earlier, computer games are much easier to modify than console games. As such, PC gamers will often list mods as a reason why PC games are clearly superior to their console counterparts, despite the aforementioned Sturgeon's Law.

Some of these even have their own work pages on this Wiki see Game Mod Index.


Game Mod

Just because the game designers made a good game doesn't mean you can't make it even better. Or at least different.

Game modifications, or "mods" for short, are any alterations to a game that were not made by the game's license holder. They can be unofficial Expansion Packs (new maps or new equipment in the same game), completely unrelated games that merely use the source game's software as a backbone ("total conversions"), or just quality-of-life adjustments to the original, such as Fan Translations, bug fixes, character Cameo appearances (which can often lead to Ninja Pirate Zombie Robot scenarios), or House Rules. (Or, if the game includes any attractive women or men, nude patches.)

Some games are deliberately designed to be easy to modify, including a "construction set" of sorts to build levels, weapons, etc., and whole modding communities spring up as a result. However, some types of mods are discouraged, or even cracked down on, for good reason: If it's a multiplayer game, a mod in the hands of a player but not their opponent usually means an unfair advantage. (Some God Modders will use these anyway and hope they aren't caught.) That's why multiplayer games are usually exempt from mods or, if running on a modular engine, deliberately designed to be hard to mod (example is that most online multiplayer of any Source engine games has a "Pure" server settings which disables any mods including texture replacements).

A few mods take advantage of content that was programmed into the game in the early stages, then scrapped from the final design. Unless space is a big issue, the programmers usually leave all this content Dummied Out in the game's code. This leaves an opening for a modder to re-introduce an access point and enjoy the missing content. albeit at their own risk, since it's usually unfinished and untested. A safer and more generally successful approach is to overhaul the graphics. PC hardware becomes more advanced over time, making it capable of handling more detailed graphics this helps keep an older game looking new and fresh and thus helping to keep it alive among the community, as well as helping to prevent the game from being overwhelmed by current-gen games.

It's much easier to mod a computer game than a hard-coded console game, but creative adjustments to a save file (and, with the most recent generation of games, console hard drive content) and/or use of a GameShark allow determined amateur programmers to mod with the best of them. Most often, however, mods of console games are edits of the ROM files used in Emulation. These tend to be referred to as "ROM hacks" and are usually considered a separate scene from mods, as running a mod is intended behavior of the original software especially in the case of games that offer an official avenue for modding, or alternatively, as mods are designed for games on open platforms such as the IBM Personal Computer and Apple Macintosh, while playing a ROM hack requires patching the game's binaries (or performing some other kind of hack) and copying said binaries to a flash cart or burned to a disc note And in the case of more recent systems, performing some kind of modification to the consoles for them to run unsigned or modified code .

Early ROM hacks were largely present in Famiclone consoles and cartridges, especially where the said system wasn't officially released. Cartridges contained graphics hacks very often. The most common ones were those where the main character was replaced by Mario, passing them off as an "installment" in the Mario series such as in the case of the now-infamous 7 Grand Dad.

Unfortunately, ROM hacks are probably the biggest offender of Sturgeon's Law. In the mid-oughts, a great many ROM hacks consisted of little else but tons of offensive and poorly drawn graphic hacks like profanity-laden graffiti, buckets of Gorn, nudity, and outright pornography, and (just to offend anybody who wasn't offended yet) swastikas, racial slurs, and pro-KKK propaganda. Most modding communities have very little moderation or quality control, save for a few that went on Quality by Popular Vote. In addition, redundancy is a bit of a problem as well &mdash a lot of mods might accomplish similar things.

As mentioned earlier, computer games are much easier to modify than console games. As such, PC gamers will often list mods as a reason why PC games are clearly superior to their console counterparts, despite the aforementioned Sturgeon's Law.

Some of these even have their own work pages on this Wiki see Game Mod Index.


Game Mod

Just because the game designers made a good game doesn't mean you can't make it even better. Or at least different.

Game modifications, or "mods" for short, are any alterations to a game that were not made by the game's license holder. They can be unofficial Expansion Packs (new maps or new equipment in the same game), completely unrelated games that merely use the source game's software as a backbone ("total conversions"), or just quality-of-life adjustments to the original, such as Fan Translations, bug fixes, character Cameo appearances (which can often lead to Ninja Pirate Zombie Robot scenarios), or House Rules. (Or, if the game includes any attractive women or men, nude patches.)

Some games are deliberately designed to be easy to modify, including a "construction set" of sorts to build levels, weapons, etc., and whole modding communities spring up as a result. However, some types of mods are discouraged, or even cracked down on, for good reason: If it's a multiplayer game, a mod in the hands of a player but not their opponent usually means an unfair advantage. (Some God Modders will use these anyway and hope they aren't caught.) That's why multiplayer games are usually exempt from mods or, if running on a modular engine, deliberately designed to be hard to mod (example is that most online multiplayer of any Source engine games has a "Pure" server settings which disables any mods including texture replacements).

A few mods take advantage of content that was programmed into the game in the early stages, then scrapped from the final design. Unless space is a big issue, the programmers usually leave all this content Dummied Out in the game's code. This leaves an opening for a modder to re-introduce an access point and enjoy the missing content. albeit at their own risk, since it's usually unfinished and untested. A safer and more generally successful approach is to overhaul the graphics. PC hardware becomes more advanced over time, making it capable of handling more detailed graphics this helps keep an older game looking new and fresh and thus helping to keep it alive among the community, as well as helping to prevent the game from being overwhelmed by current-gen games.

It's much easier to mod a computer game than a hard-coded console game, but creative adjustments to a save file (and, with the most recent generation of games, console hard drive content) and/or use of a GameShark allow determined amateur programmers to mod with the best of them. Most often, however, mods of console games are edits of the ROM files used in Emulation. These tend to be referred to as "ROM hacks" and are usually considered a separate scene from mods, as running a mod is intended behavior of the original software especially in the case of games that offer an official avenue for modding, or alternatively, as mods are designed for games on open platforms such as the IBM Personal Computer and Apple Macintosh, while playing a ROM hack requires patching the game's binaries (or performing some other kind of hack) and copying said binaries to a flash cart or burned to a disc note And in the case of more recent systems, performing some kind of modification to the consoles for them to run unsigned or modified code .

Early ROM hacks were largely present in Famiclone consoles and cartridges, especially where the said system wasn't officially released. Cartridges contained graphics hacks very often. The most common ones were those where the main character was replaced by Mario, passing them off as an "installment" in the Mario series such as in the case of the now-infamous 7 Grand Dad.

Unfortunately, ROM hacks are probably the biggest offender of Sturgeon's Law. In the mid-oughts, a great many ROM hacks consisted of little else but tons of offensive and poorly drawn graphic hacks like profanity-laden graffiti, buckets of Gorn, nudity, and outright pornography, and (just to offend anybody who wasn't offended yet) swastikas, racial slurs, and pro-KKK propaganda. Most modding communities have very little moderation or quality control, save for a few that went on Quality by Popular Vote. In addition, redundancy is a bit of a problem as well &mdash a lot of mods might accomplish similar things.

As mentioned earlier, computer games are much easier to modify than console games. As such, PC gamers will often list mods as a reason why PC games are clearly superior to their console counterparts, despite the aforementioned Sturgeon's Law.

Some of these even have their own work pages on this Wiki see Game Mod Index.


Game Mod

Just because the game designers made a good game doesn't mean you can't make it even better. Or at least different.

Game modifications, or "mods" for short, are any alterations to a game that were not made by the game's license holder. They can be unofficial Expansion Packs (new maps or new equipment in the same game), completely unrelated games that merely use the source game's software as a backbone ("total conversions"), or just quality-of-life adjustments to the original, such as Fan Translations, bug fixes, character Cameo appearances (which can often lead to Ninja Pirate Zombie Robot scenarios), or House Rules. (Or, if the game includes any attractive women or men, nude patches.)

Some games are deliberately designed to be easy to modify, including a "construction set" of sorts to build levels, weapons, etc., and whole modding communities spring up as a result. However, some types of mods are discouraged, or even cracked down on, for good reason: If it's a multiplayer game, a mod in the hands of a player but not their opponent usually means an unfair advantage. (Some God Modders will use these anyway and hope they aren't caught.) That's why multiplayer games are usually exempt from mods or, if running on a modular engine, deliberately designed to be hard to mod (example is that most online multiplayer of any Source engine games has a "Pure" server settings which disables any mods including texture replacements).

A few mods take advantage of content that was programmed into the game in the early stages, then scrapped from the final design. Unless space is a big issue, the programmers usually leave all this content Dummied Out in the game's code. This leaves an opening for a modder to re-introduce an access point and enjoy the missing content. albeit at their own risk, since it's usually unfinished and untested. A safer and more generally successful approach is to overhaul the graphics. PC hardware becomes more advanced over time, making it capable of handling more detailed graphics this helps keep an older game looking new and fresh and thus helping to keep it alive among the community, as well as helping to prevent the game from being overwhelmed by current-gen games.

It's much easier to mod a computer game than a hard-coded console game, but creative adjustments to a save file (and, with the most recent generation of games, console hard drive content) and/or use of a GameShark allow determined amateur programmers to mod with the best of them. Most often, however, mods of console games are edits of the ROM files used in Emulation. These tend to be referred to as "ROM hacks" and are usually considered a separate scene from mods, as running a mod is intended behavior of the original software especially in the case of games that offer an official avenue for modding, or alternatively, as mods are designed for games on open platforms such as the IBM Personal Computer and Apple Macintosh, while playing a ROM hack requires patching the game's binaries (or performing some other kind of hack) and copying said binaries to a flash cart or burned to a disc note And in the case of more recent systems, performing some kind of modification to the consoles for them to run unsigned or modified code .

Early ROM hacks were largely present in Famiclone consoles and cartridges, especially where the said system wasn't officially released. Cartridges contained graphics hacks very often. The most common ones were those where the main character was replaced by Mario, passing them off as an "installment" in the Mario series such as in the case of the now-infamous 7 Grand Dad.

Unfortunately, ROM hacks are probably the biggest offender of Sturgeon's Law. In the mid-oughts, a great many ROM hacks consisted of little else but tons of offensive and poorly drawn graphic hacks like profanity-laden graffiti, buckets of Gorn, nudity, and outright pornography, and (just to offend anybody who wasn't offended yet) swastikas, racial slurs, and pro-KKK propaganda. Most modding communities have very little moderation or quality control, save for a few that went on Quality by Popular Vote. In addition, redundancy is a bit of a problem as well &mdash a lot of mods might accomplish similar things.

As mentioned earlier, computer games are much easier to modify than console games. As such, PC gamers will often list mods as a reason why PC games are clearly superior to their console counterparts, despite the aforementioned Sturgeon's Law.

Some of these even have their own work pages on this Wiki see Game Mod Index.