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4 Reasons Why We Don’t Need Caffeinated Water in Our Lives

4 Reasons Why We Don’t Need Caffeinated Water in Our Lives


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Would you swap your coffee and tea for another bottle of infused water?

Buying a bottle of water is no longer the simple purchase it once was.

I have recently been made aware that caffeinated water is the latest health trend: Apparently coconut water’s days in the spotlight are over. Some of those seemingly standard, overpriced, bottles of water are now packed full of caffeine (typically containing the same amount as in a cup of tea). Here are four reasons why I believe that this latest drink-industry creation really is a confusing and unnatural waste of everybody’s time:

1. Water should be a natural, hydrating liquid.

We are all aware that there is a certain volume of water that we should drink every day, and that water is an essential life-source. Adulterating it by infusing it with caffeine suddenly transforms this most natural of drinks into an unnatural substance that could have a negative effect on our bodies, rather than performing the simple, but vital job that regular water does.

2. We love coffee.

Either the companies creating caffeinated water want us to consume more caffeine, which would be unhealthy and unhelpful (and would mean that I would definitely never be able to get to sleep), or they are suggesting that we swap our coffee for a bottle of water. But really, we love coffee, and are not willing to swap this delicious drink for yet another sip of water.

3. We love tea.

Rather than a warming cup of tea, or a chilled iced tea, why not drink a bottle of water? Well, because we already have to drink so much water that we actually do enjoy occasionally drinking tea. Please let us consume our caffeine in a drink that isn’t water to make our lives slightly more exciting

4. Refreshing caffeinated drinks already exist.

It could be argued that caffeinated water is perfect for summer as it will refresh us and wake us up, but actually we already have a solution for that. I’m sure I’m not the only one who would be incredibly sad if all my summertime iced coffee and tea consumption was swapped for a bottle of neutral-tasting, caffeine-infused water.


Five reasons why everyone is so busy – Tony Crabbe

It’s all too much. We have too much to do, too much information and too much pressure. Today you will consume the equivalent of 174 newspapers worth of content (five times as much as you would have done in 1986).

In this world of too much, we are simultaneously overstimulated and bored, enriched and empty, connected yet isolated and alone”

In the time it will take you to read this page, 300 million emails will be sent. In the last 10 seconds, 100 people have discovered the internet and email for the first time, joining nearly three billion others, and are now adding to the noise.

We live in an age where computing power and internet connection speeds are increasing exponentially along with sheer quantity of information and entertainment. We are constantly bombarded with the “seething static” of limitless information, communication and choice. In this world of too much, we are simultaneously overstimulated and bored, enriched and empty, connected yet isolated and alone.

For information workers, the last 20 years have felt like drinking from a water fountain that has become a fire hose. As our tools for productivity improve, we produce more. As it becomes easier to communicate, we communicate more.

How organisations kill engagement through poor emotional intelligence (webinar)

18 MAY 2016, 2:00PM
Tony Crabbe appears in this Personnel Today webinar – register now

For example, in 1986 the average worker produced the equivalent of 2.5 newspaper pages of content each day. In 2011 it was estimated that this amount had risen to six complete newspapers each and every day. That’s a 200-fold increase in output.

Every action we take, every email we send, has a consequence for someone else. So as we are all able to do more we create more work for others, who in turn are doing more, which means we all have more and more demands on us.

The simple fact is that “too much” is here to stay, and will worsen each year. There is an inevitability to this.

Year after year you will receive more electronic communication, be exposed to more information and be expected to be on top of more stuff.

You will receive even more emails next year. None of us is going to turn the technological clock back 30 years, and our organisations are unlikely to start saying “Relax – Don’t do as much work!”

Busyness is not essential. Yes, there is a lot to do, but believing you are always busy because you have so much to do is both false and unhelpful. This is why you are busy:


Five reasons why everyone is so busy – Tony Crabbe

It’s all too much. We have too much to do, too much information and too much pressure. Today you will consume the equivalent of 174 newspapers worth of content (five times as much as you would have done in 1986).

In this world of too much, we are simultaneously overstimulated and bored, enriched and empty, connected yet isolated and alone”

In the time it will take you to read this page, 300 million emails will be sent. In the last 10 seconds, 100 people have discovered the internet and email for the first time, joining nearly three billion others, and are now adding to the noise.

We live in an age where computing power and internet connection speeds are increasing exponentially along with sheer quantity of information and entertainment. We are constantly bombarded with the “seething static” of limitless information, communication and choice. In this world of too much, we are simultaneously overstimulated and bored, enriched and empty, connected yet isolated and alone.

For information workers, the last 20 years have felt like drinking from a water fountain that has become a fire hose. As our tools for productivity improve, we produce more. As it becomes easier to communicate, we communicate more.

How organisations kill engagement through poor emotional intelligence (webinar)

18 MAY 2016, 2:00PM
Tony Crabbe appears in this Personnel Today webinar – register now

For example, in 1986 the average worker produced the equivalent of 2.5 newspaper pages of content each day. In 2011 it was estimated that this amount had risen to six complete newspapers each and every day. That’s a 200-fold increase in output.

Every action we take, every email we send, has a consequence for someone else. So as we are all able to do more we create more work for others, who in turn are doing more, which means we all have more and more demands on us.

The simple fact is that “too much” is here to stay, and will worsen each year. There is an inevitability to this.

Year after year you will receive more electronic communication, be exposed to more information and be expected to be on top of more stuff.

You will receive even more emails next year. None of us is going to turn the technological clock back 30 years, and our organisations are unlikely to start saying “Relax – Don’t do as much work!”

Busyness is not essential. Yes, there is a lot to do, but believing you are always busy because you have so much to do is both false and unhelpful. This is why you are busy:


Five reasons why everyone is so busy – Tony Crabbe

It’s all too much. We have too much to do, too much information and too much pressure. Today you will consume the equivalent of 174 newspapers worth of content (five times as much as you would have done in 1986).

In this world of too much, we are simultaneously overstimulated and bored, enriched and empty, connected yet isolated and alone”

In the time it will take you to read this page, 300 million emails will be sent. In the last 10 seconds, 100 people have discovered the internet and email for the first time, joining nearly three billion others, and are now adding to the noise.

We live in an age where computing power and internet connection speeds are increasing exponentially along with sheer quantity of information and entertainment. We are constantly bombarded with the “seething static” of limitless information, communication and choice. In this world of too much, we are simultaneously overstimulated and bored, enriched and empty, connected yet isolated and alone.

For information workers, the last 20 years have felt like drinking from a water fountain that has become a fire hose. As our tools for productivity improve, we produce more. As it becomes easier to communicate, we communicate more.

How organisations kill engagement through poor emotional intelligence (webinar)

18 MAY 2016, 2:00PM
Tony Crabbe appears in this Personnel Today webinar – register now

For example, in 1986 the average worker produced the equivalent of 2.5 newspaper pages of content each day. In 2011 it was estimated that this amount had risen to six complete newspapers each and every day. That’s a 200-fold increase in output.

Every action we take, every email we send, has a consequence for someone else. So as we are all able to do more we create more work for others, who in turn are doing more, which means we all have more and more demands on us.

The simple fact is that “too much” is here to stay, and will worsen each year. There is an inevitability to this.

Year after year you will receive more electronic communication, be exposed to more information and be expected to be on top of more stuff.

You will receive even more emails next year. None of us is going to turn the technological clock back 30 years, and our organisations are unlikely to start saying “Relax – Don’t do as much work!”

Busyness is not essential. Yes, there is a lot to do, but believing you are always busy because you have so much to do is both false and unhelpful. This is why you are busy:


Five reasons why everyone is so busy – Tony Crabbe

It’s all too much. We have too much to do, too much information and too much pressure. Today you will consume the equivalent of 174 newspapers worth of content (five times as much as you would have done in 1986).

In this world of too much, we are simultaneously overstimulated and bored, enriched and empty, connected yet isolated and alone”

In the time it will take you to read this page, 300 million emails will be sent. In the last 10 seconds, 100 people have discovered the internet and email for the first time, joining nearly three billion others, and are now adding to the noise.

We live in an age where computing power and internet connection speeds are increasing exponentially along with sheer quantity of information and entertainment. We are constantly bombarded with the “seething static” of limitless information, communication and choice. In this world of too much, we are simultaneously overstimulated and bored, enriched and empty, connected yet isolated and alone.

For information workers, the last 20 years have felt like drinking from a water fountain that has become a fire hose. As our tools for productivity improve, we produce more. As it becomes easier to communicate, we communicate more.

How organisations kill engagement through poor emotional intelligence (webinar)

18 MAY 2016, 2:00PM
Tony Crabbe appears in this Personnel Today webinar – register now

For example, in 1986 the average worker produced the equivalent of 2.5 newspaper pages of content each day. In 2011 it was estimated that this amount had risen to six complete newspapers each and every day. That’s a 200-fold increase in output.

Every action we take, every email we send, has a consequence for someone else. So as we are all able to do more we create more work for others, who in turn are doing more, which means we all have more and more demands on us.

The simple fact is that “too much” is here to stay, and will worsen each year. There is an inevitability to this.

Year after year you will receive more electronic communication, be exposed to more information and be expected to be on top of more stuff.

You will receive even more emails next year. None of us is going to turn the technological clock back 30 years, and our organisations are unlikely to start saying “Relax – Don’t do as much work!”

Busyness is not essential. Yes, there is a lot to do, but believing you are always busy because you have so much to do is both false and unhelpful. This is why you are busy:


Five reasons why everyone is so busy – Tony Crabbe

It’s all too much. We have too much to do, too much information and too much pressure. Today you will consume the equivalent of 174 newspapers worth of content (five times as much as you would have done in 1986).

In this world of too much, we are simultaneously overstimulated and bored, enriched and empty, connected yet isolated and alone”

In the time it will take you to read this page, 300 million emails will be sent. In the last 10 seconds, 100 people have discovered the internet and email for the first time, joining nearly three billion others, and are now adding to the noise.

We live in an age where computing power and internet connection speeds are increasing exponentially along with sheer quantity of information and entertainment. We are constantly bombarded with the “seething static” of limitless information, communication and choice. In this world of too much, we are simultaneously overstimulated and bored, enriched and empty, connected yet isolated and alone.

For information workers, the last 20 years have felt like drinking from a water fountain that has become a fire hose. As our tools for productivity improve, we produce more. As it becomes easier to communicate, we communicate more.

How organisations kill engagement through poor emotional intelligence (webinar)

18 MAY 2016, 2:00PM
Tony Crabbe appears in this Personnel Today webinar – register now

For example, in 1986 the average worker produced the equivalent of 2.5 newspaper pages of content each day. In 2011 it was estimated that this amount had risen to six complete newspapers each and every day. That’s a 200-fold increase in output.

Every action we take, every email we send, has a consequence for someone else. So as we are all able to do more we create more work for others, who in turn are doing more, which means we all have more and more demands on us.

The simple fact is that “too much” is here to stay, and will worsen each year. There is an inevitability to this.

Year after year you will receive more electronic communication, be exposed to more information and be expected to be on top of more stuff.

You will receive even more emails next year. None of us is going to turn the technological clock back 30 years, and our organisations are unlikely to start saying “Relax – Don’t do as much work!”

Busyness is not essential. Yes, there is a lot to do, but believing you are always busy because you have so much to do is both false and unhelpful. This is why you are busy:


Five reasons why everyone is so busy – Tony Crabbe

It’s all too much. We have too much to do, too much information and too much pressure. Today you will consume the equivalent of 174 newspapers worth of content (five times as much as you would have done in 1986).

In this world of too much, we are simultaneously overstimulated and bored, enriched and empty, connected yet isolated and alone”

In the time it will take you to read this page, 300 million emails will be sent. In the last 10 seconds, 100 people have discovered the internet and email for the first time, joining nearly three billion others, and are now adding to the noise.

We live in an age where computing power and internet connection speeds are increasing exponentially along with sheer quantity of information and entertainment. We are constantly bombarded with the “seething static” of limitless information, communication and choice. In this world of too much, we are simultaneously overstimulated and bored, enriched and empty, connected yet isolated and alone.

For information workers, the last 20 years have felt like drinking from a water fountain that has become a fire hose. As our tools for productivity improve, we produce more. As it becomes easier to communicate, we communicate more.

How organisations kill engagement through poor emotional intelligence (webinar)

18 MAY 2016, 2:00PM
Tony Crabbe appears in this Personnel Today webinar – register now

For example, in 1986 the average worker produced the equivalent of 2.5 newspaper pages of content each day. In 2011 it was estimated that this amount had risen to six complete newspapers each and every day. That’s a 200-fold increase in output.

Every action we take, every email we send, has a consequence for someone else. So as we are all able to do more we create more work for others, who in turn are doing more, which means we all have more and more demands on us.

The simple fact is that “too much” is here to stay, and will worsen each year. There is an inevitability to this.

Year after year you will receive more electronic communication, be exposed to more information and be expected to be on top of more stuff.

You will receive even more emails next year. None of us is going to turn the technological clock back 30 years, and our organisations are unlikely to start saying “Relax – Don’t do as much work!”

Busyness is not essential. Yes, there is a lot to do, but believing you are always busy because you have so much to do is both false and unhelpful. This is why you are busy:


Five reasons why everyone is so busy – Tony Crabbe

It’s all too much. We have too much to do, too much information and too much pressure. Today you will consume the equivalent of 174 newspapers worth of content (five times as much as you would have done in 1986).

In this world of too much, we are simultaneously overstimulated and bored, enriched and empty, connected yet isolated and alone”

In the time it will take you to read this page, 300 million emails will be sent. In the last 10 seconds, 100 people have discovered the internet and email for the first time, joining nearly three billion others, and are now adding to the noise.

We live in an age where computing power and internet connection speeds are increasing exponentially along with sheer quantity of information and entertainment. We are constantly bombarded with the “seething static” of limitless information, communication and choice. In this world of too much, we are simultaneously overstimulated and bored, enriched and empty, connected yet isolated and alone.

For information workers, the last 20 years have felt like drinking from a water fountain that has become a fire hose. As our tools for productivity improve, we produce more. As it becomes easier to communicate, we communicate more.

How organisations kill engagement through poor emotional intelligence (webinar)

18 MAY 2016, 2:00PM
Tony Crabbe appears in this Personnel Today webinar – register now

For example, in 1986 the average worker produced the equivalent of 2.5 newspaper pages of content each day. In 2011 it was estimated that this amount had risen to six complete newspapers each and every day. That’s a 200-fold increase in output.

Every action we take, every email we send, has a consequence for someone else. So as we are all able to do more we create more work for others, who in turn are doing more, which means we all have more and more demands on us.

The simple fact is that “too much” is here to stay, and will worsen each year. There is an inevitability to this.

Year after year you will receive more electronic communication, be exposed to more information and be expected to be on top of more stuff.

You will receive even more emails next year. None of us is going to turn the technological clock back 30 years, and our organisations are unlikely to start saying “Relax – Don’t do as much work!”

Busyness is not essential. Yes, there is a lot to do, but believing you are always busy because you have so much to do is both false and unhelpful. This is why you are busy:


Five reasons why everyone is so busy – Tony Crabbe

It’s all too much. We have too much to do, too much information and too much pressure. Today you will consume the equivalent of 174 newspapers worth of content (five times as much as you would have done in 1986).

In this world of too much, we are simultaneously overstimulated and bored, enriched and empty, connected yet isolated and alone”

In the time it will take you to read this page, 300 million emails will be sent. In the last 10 seconds, 100 people have discovered the internet and email for the first time, joining nearly three billion others, and are now adding to the noise.

We live in an age where computing power and internet connection speeds are increasing exponentially along with sheer quantity of information and entertainment. We are constantly bombarded with the “seething static” of limitless information, communication and choice. In this world of too much, we are simultaneously overstimulated and bored, enriched and empty, connected yet isolated and alone.

For information workers, the last 20 years have felt like drinking from a water fountain that has become a fire hose. As our tools for productivity improve, we produce more. As it becomes easier to communicate, we communicate more.

How organisations kill engagement through poor emotional intelligence (webinar)

18 MAY 2016, 2:00PM
Tony Crabbe appears in this Personnel Today webinar – register now

For example, in 1986 the average worker produced the equivalent of 2.5 newspaper pages of content each day. In 2011 it was estimated that this amount had risen to six complete newspapers each and every day. That’s a 200-fold increase in output.

Every action we take, every email we send, has a consequence for someone else. So as we are all able to do more we create more work for others, who in turn are doing more, which means we all have more and more demands on us.

The simple fact is that “too much” is here to stay, and will worsen each year. There is an inevitability to this.

Year after year you will receive more electronic communication, be exposed to more information and be expected to be on top of more stuff.

You will receive even more emails next year. None of us is going to turn the technological clock back 30 years, and our organisations are unlikely to start saying “Relax – Don’t do as much work!”

Busyness is not essential. Yes, there is a lot to do, but believing you are always busy because you have so much to do is both false and unhelpful. This is why you are busy:


Five reasons why everyone is so busy – Tony Crabbe

It’s all too much. We have too much to do, too much information and too much pressure. Today you will consume the equivalent of 174 newspapers worth of content (five times as much as you would have done in 1986).

In this world of too much, we are simultaneously overstimulated and bored, enriched and empty, connected yet isolated and alone”

In the time it will take you to read this page, 300 million emails will be sent. In the last 10 seconds, 100 people have discovered the internet and email for the first time, joining nearly three billion others, and are now adding to the noise.

We live in an age where computing power and internet connection speeds are increasing exponentially along with sheer quantity of information and entertainment. We are constantly bombarded with the “seething static” of limitless information, communication and choice. In this world of too much, we are simultaneously overstimulated and bored, enriched and empty, connected yet isolated and alone.

For information workers, the last 20 years have felt like drinking from a water fountain that has become a fire hose. As our tools for productivity improve, we produce more. As it becomes easier to communicate, we communicate more.

How organisations kill engagement through poor emotional intelligence (webinar)

18 MAY 2016, 2:00PM
Tony Crabbe appears in this Personnel Today webinar – register now

For example, in 1986 the average worker produced the equivalent of 2.5 newspaper pages of content each day. In 2011 it was estimated that this amount had risen to six complete newspapers each and every day. That’s a 200-fold increase in output.

Every action we take, every email we send, has a consequence for someone else. So as we are all able to do more we create more work for others, who in turn are doing more, which means we all have more and more demands on us.

The simple fact is that “too much” is here to stay, and will worsen each year. There is an inevitability to this.

Year after year you will receive more electronic communication, be exposed to more information and be expected to be on top of more stuff.

You will receive even more emails next year. None of us is going to turn the technological clock back 30 years, and our organisations are unlikely to start saying “Relax – Don’t do as much work!”

Busyness is not essential. Yes, there is a lot to do, but believing you are always busy because you have so much to do is both false and unhelpful. This is why you are busy:


Five reasons why everyone is so busy – Tony Crabbe

It’s all too much. We have too much to do, too much information and too much pressure. Today you will consume the equivalent of 174 newspapers worth of content (five times as much as you would have done in 1986).

In this world of too much, we are simultaneously overstimulated and bored, enriched and empty, connected yet isolated and alone”

In the time it will take you to read this page, 300 million emails will be sent. In the last 10 seconds, 100 people have discovered the internet and email for the first time, joining nearly three billion others, and are now adding to the noise.

We live in an age where computing power and internet connection speeds are increasing exponentially along with sheer quantity of information and entertainment. We are constantly bombarded with the “seething static” of limitless information, communication and choice. In this world of too much, we are simultaneously overstimulated and bored, enriched and empty, connected yet isolated and alone.

For information workers, the last 20 years have felt like drinking from a water fountain that has become a fire hose. As our tools for productivity improve, we produce more. As it becomes easier to communicate, we communicate more.

How organisations kill engagement through poor emotional intelligence (webinar)

18 MAY 2016, 2:00PM
Tony Crabbe appears in this Personnel Today webinar – register now

For example, in 1986 the average worker produced the equivalent of 2.5 newspaper pages of content each day. In 2011 it was estimated that this amount had risen to six complete newspapers each and every day. That’s a 200-fold increase in output.

Every action we take, every email we send, has a consequence for someone else. So as we are all able to do more we create more work for others, who in turn are doing more, which means we all have more and more demands on us.

The simple fact is that “too much” is here to stay, and will worsen each year. There is an inevitability to this.

Year after year you will receive more electronic communication, be exposed to more information and be expected to be on top of more stuff.

You will receive even more emails next year. None of us is going to turn the technological clock back 30 years, and our organisations are unlikely to start saying “Relax – Don’t do as much work!”

Busyness is not essential. Yes, there is a lot to do, but believing you are always busy because you have so much to do is both false and unhelpful. This is why you are busy:



Comments:

  1. Nataur

    Excuse, topic has mixed. It is removed

  2. Parsa

    You are wrong. I can prove it.

  3. Mazut

    SpasibO we will use)

  4. Sakora

    I still remember the age of 18

  5. Spere

    An incomparable phrase, I really like it :)

  6. Palmere

    I beg your pardon that I intervene, there is a proposal to go along another path.

  7. Gawyn

    Is grateful for the help in this matter, how can I thank you?



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