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Masters of Mixology: Charles H. Baker

Masters of Mixology: Charles H. Baker


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In the spring of 1926, Charles H. Baker, Jr., was stranded on a lifeboat in the Sulu Sea off the coast of North Borneo. Before his motor died, he had been on an excursion to the city of Sandakan — a three-hour tour, you might say — from the SS Resolute, a round-the-world steamer that had brought him from New York and was now anchored 14 miles offshore.

Across the still, sparkling water, a small boat "with a sail like a striped butterfly" approached; its captain was wearing nothing but a "G-string and a headdress."

"Somehow we managed to convey the idea that we were not wallowing there on a glassy sea with a molten brass sun striking like a sword across our necks, because we wanted to," Baker wrote in his classic two-volume The Gentleman’s Companion, first published in 1939. When finally pulled into port by a friendly tug, Baker headed straight to a bar and enjoyed The Colonial Cooler.

Adventure stories that end in cocktail recipes — these make up the bulk of Baker’s work, most notably his two masterpieces, The South American Gentleman’s Companion, published in 1951, and the aforementioned The Gentleman’s Companion, which I received as a gift in 2000.

As I returned again and again to Baker’s breathtakingly florid prose on those deckle-edged pages, I felt the world spread out like an Indiana Jones treasure map, my route marked in red, leading to exotic food and drinks.

Baker, born on Christmas Day in 1895, wasn’t always a globetrotting adventurer/poet laureate of the cocktail. He spent much of his 20s selling industrial abrasives in Worcester, Mass., tried his hand at interior decorating in his 30s and didn’t publish his first book until he was 43. In other words, there’s still time to jump on that round-the-world steamer.

So this year, when making decisions, it might be useful to ask yourself, as I once did: What would Charles H. Baker do?

Click here for The Colonial Cooler recipe.

— St. John Frizell, Liquor.com


Hanky Panky

If I were stranded on a desert island—a desert island with a bar, that is—and I could have only one book to use when my memory failed me, Harry Craddock’s 1930 “The Savoy Cocktail Book” would keep me company. It’s probably the 20th century’s most important tome of its kind, having preserved many of the era’s most important drinks.

Craddock, an American who fled the country when Prohibition hit in 1920, documented hundreds of drinks that he served (and, in some cases, invented) at American Bar in London’s swank Savoy Hotel. More than a few of them—the Pegu Club, for instance—are still served today in cocktail bars.

The Savoy Hotel closed in 2007 for a three-year renovation, reopening in October 2010 with a few new bells and whistles. But while the establishment has been updated and modernized, cocktail fans will still recognize the historic bar. And that’s where they can still order some of the bar’s most famous drinks.

Craddock wasn’t the only head bartender at the Savoy who stood out from the crowd. He followed Ada Coleman, after all. “Coley,” as she was known to her regulars, graced American Bar from 1903 until 1925 and served drinks to just about everybody, including Mark Twain, Diamond Jim Brady and the Prince of Wales. Toast her today by fixing her signature Hanky Panky, a fabulous mixture featuring equal parts gin and sweet vermouth. It starts off like a Martinez, but rather than maraschino liqueur and bitters, it receives a couple dashes of the bitter amaro Fernet-Branca for good measure.

Coleman created the cocktail for Sir Charles Hawtrey, a celebrated actor who visited the bar. As the story goes, he asked for a drink with a punch. Coleman served him this fine number, leading him to exclaim “By Jove! That is the real hanky-panky!” The name stuck.

This recipe is adapted from Charles H. Baker Jr.’s 1939 book, “The Gentleman’s Companion.”


Hanky Panky

If I were stranded on a desert island—a desert island with a bar, that is—and I could have only one book to use when my memory failed me, Harry Craddock’s 1930 “The Savoy Cocktail Book” would keep me company. It’s probably the 20th century’s most important tome of its kind, having preserved many of the era’s most important drinks.

Craddock, an American who fled the country when Prohibition hit in 1920, documented hundreds of drinks that he served (and, in some cases, invented) at American Bar in London’s swank Savoy Hotel. More than a few of them—the Pegu Club, for instance—are still served today in cocktail bars.

The Savoy Hotel closed in 2007 for a three-year renovation, reopening in October 2010 with a few new bells and whistles. But while the establishment has been updated and modernized, cocktail fans will still recognize the historic bar. And that’s where they can still order some of the bar’s most famous drinks.

Craddock wasn’t the only head bartender at the Savoy who stood out from the crowd. He followed Ada Coleman, after all. “Coley,” as she was known to her regulars, graced American Bar from 1903 until 1925 and served drinks to just about everybody, including Mark Twain, Diamond Jim Brady and the Prince of Wales. Toast her today by fixing her signature Hanky Panky, a fabulous mixture featuring equal parts gin and sweet vermouth. It starts off like a Martinez, but rather than maraschino liqueur and bitters, it receives a couple dashes of the bitter amaro Fernet-Branca for good measure.

Coleman created the cocktail for Sir Charles Hawtrey, a celebrated actor who visited the bar. As the story goes, he asked for a drink with a punch. Coleman served him this fine number, leading him to exclaim “By Jove! That is the real hanky-panky!” The name stuck.

This recipe is adapted from Charles H. Baker Jr.’s 1939 book, “The Gentleman’s Companion.”


Hanky Panky

If I were stranded on a desert island—a desert island with a bar, that is—and I could have only one book to use when my memory failed me, Harry Craddock’s 1930 “The Savoy Cocktail Book” would keep me company. It’s probably the 20th century’s most important tome of its kind, having preserved many of the era’s most important drinks.

Craddock, an American who fled the country when Prohibition hit in 1920, documented hundreds of drinks that he served (and, in some cases, invented) at American Bar in London’s swank Savoy Hotel. More than a few of them—the Pegu Club, for instance—are still served today in cocktail bars.

The Savoy Hotel closed in 2007 for a three-year renovation, reopening in October 2010 with a few new bells and whistles. But while the establishment has been updated and modernized, cocktail fans will still recognize the historic bar. And that’s where they can still order some of the bar’s most famous drinks.

Craddock wasn’t the only head bartender at the Savoy who stood out from the crowd. He followed Ada Coleman, after all. “Coley,” as she was known to her regulars, graced American Bar from 1903 until 1925 and served drinks to just about everybody, including Mark Twain, Diamond Jim Brady and the Prince of Wales. Toast her today by fixing her signature Hanky Panky, a fabulous mixture featuring equal parts gin and sweet vermouth. It starts off like a Martinez, but rather than maraschino liqueur and bitters, it receives a couple dashes of the bitter amaro Fernet-Branca for good measure.

Coleman created the cocktail for Sir Charles Hawtrey, a celebrated actor who visited the bar. As the story goes, he asked for a drink with a punch. Coleman served him this fine number, leading him to exclaim “By Jove! That is the real hanky-panky!” The name stuck.

This recipe is adapted from Charles H. Baker Jr.’s 1939 book, “The Gentleman’s Companion.”


Hanky Panky

If I were stranded on a desert island—a desert island with a bar, that is—and I could have only one book to use when my memory failed me, Harry Craddock’s 1930 “The Savoy Cocktail Book” would keep me company. It’s probably the 20th century’s most important tome of its kind, having preserved many of the era’s most important drinks.

Craddock, an American who fled the country when Prohibition hit in 1920, documented hundreds of drinks that he served (and, in some cases, invented) at American Bar in London’s swank Savoy Hotel. More than a few of them—the Pegu Club, for instance—are still served today in cocktail bars.

The Savoy Hotel closed in 2007 for a three-year renovation, reopening in October 2010 with a few new bells and whistles. But while the establishment has been updated and modernized, cocktail fans will still recognize the historic bar. And that’s where they can still order some of the bar’s most famous drinks.

Craddock wasn’t the only head bartender at the Savoy who stood out from the crowd. He followed Ada Coleman, after all. “Coley,” as she was known to her regulars, graced American Bar from 1903 until 1925 and served drinks to just about everybody, including Mark Twain, Diamond Jim Brady and the Prince of Wales. Toast her today by fixing her signature Hanky Panky, a fabulous mixture featuring equal parts gin and sweet vermouth. It starts off like a Martinez, but rather than maraschino liqueur and bitters, it receives a couple dashes of the bitter amaro Fernet-Branca for good measure.

Coleman created the cocktail for Sir Charles Hawtrey, a celebrated actor who visited the bar. As the story goes, he asked for a drink with a punch. Coleman served him this fine number, leading him to exclaim “By Jove! That is the real hanky-panky!” The name stuck.

This recipe is adapted from Charles H. Baker Jr.’s 1939 book, “The Gentleman’s Companion.”


Hanky Panky

If I were stranded on a desert island—a desert island with a bar, that is—and I could have only one book to use when my memory failed me, Harry Craddock’s 1930 “The Savoy Cocktail Book” would keep me company. It’s probably the 20th century’s most important tome of its kind, having preserved many of the era’s most important drinks.

Craddock, an American who fled the country when Prohibition hit in 1920, documented hundreds of drinks that he served (and, in some cases, invented) at American Bar in London’s swank Savoy Hotel. More than a few of them—the Pegu Club, for instance—are still served today in cocktail bars.

The Savoy Hotel closed in 2007 for a three-year renovation, reopening in October 2010 with a few new bells and whistles. But while the establishment has been updated and modernized, cocktail fans will still recognize the historic bar. And that’s where they can still order some of the bar’s most famous drinks.

Craddock wasn’t the only head bartender at the Savoy who stood out from the crowd. He followed Ada Coleman, after all. “Coley,” as she was known to her regulars, graced American Bar from 1903 until 1925 and served drinks to just about everybody, including Mark Twain, Diamond Jim Brady and the Prince of Wales. Toast her today by fixing her signature Hanky Panky, a fabulous mixture featuring equal parts gin and sweet vermouth. It starts off like a Martinez, but rather than maraschino liqueur and bitters, it receives a couple dashes of the bitter amaro Fernet-Branca for good measure.

Coleman created the cocktail for Sir Charles Hawtrey, a celebrated actor who visited the bar. As the story goes, he asked for a drink with a punch. Coleman served him this fine number, leading him to exclaim “By Jove! That is the real hanky-panky!” The name stuck.

This recipe is adapted from Charles H. Baker Jr.’s 1939 book, “The Gentleman’s Companion.”


Hanky Panky

If I were stranded on a desert island—a desert island with a bar, that is—and I could have only one book to use when my memory failed me, Harry Craddock’s 1930 “The Savoy Cocktail Book” would keep me company. It’s probably the 20th century’s most important tome of its kind, having preserved many of the era’s most important drinks.

Craddock, an American who fled the country when Prohibition hit in 1920, documented hundreds of drinks that he served (and, in some cases, invented) at American Bar in London’s swank Savoy Hotel. More than a few of them—the Pegu Club, for instance—are still served today in cocktail bars.

The Savoy Hotel closed in 2007 for a three-year renovation, reopening in October 2010 with a few new bells and whistles. But while the establishment has been updated and modernized, cocktail fans will still recognize the historic bar. And that’s where they can still order some of the bar’s most famous drinks.

Craddock wasn’t the only head bartender at the Savoy who stood out from the crowd. He followed Ada Coleman, after all. “Coley,” as she was known to her regulars, graced American Bar from 1903 until 1925 and served drinks to just about everybody, including Mark Twain, Diamond Jim Brady and the Prince of Wales. Toast her today by fixing her signature Hanky Panky, a fabulous mixture featuring equal parts gin and sweet vermouth. It starts off like a Martinez, but rather than maraschino liqueur and bitters, it receives a couple dashes of the bitter amaro Fernet-Branca for good measure.

Coleman created the cocktail for Sir Charles Hawtrey, a celebrated actor who visited the bar. As the story goes, he asked for a drink with a punch. Coleman served him this fine number, leading him to exclaim “By Jove! That is the real hanky-panky!” The name stuck.

This recipe is adapted from Charles H. Baker Jr.’s 1939 book, “The Gentleman’s Companion.”


Hanky Panky

If I were stranded on a desert island—a desert island with a bar, that is—and I could have only one book to use when my memory failed me, Harry Craddock’s 1930 “The Savoy Cocktail Book” would keep me company. It’s probably the 20th century’s most important tome of its kind, having preserved many of the era’s most important drinks.

Craddock, an American who fled the country when Prohibition hit in 1920, documented hundreds of drinks that he served (and, in some cases, invented) at American Bar in London’s swank Savoy Hotel. More than a few of them—the Pegu Club, for instance—are still served today in cocktail bars.

The Savoy Hotel closed in 2007 for a three-year renovation, reopening in October 2010 with a few new bells and whistles. But while the establishment has been updated and modernized, cocktail fans will still recognize the historic bar. And that’s where they can still order some of the bar’s most famous drinks.

Craddock wasn’t the only head bartender at the Savoy who stood out from the crowd. He followed Ada Coleman, after all. “Coley,” as she was known to her regulars, graced American Bar from 1903 until 1925 and served drinks to just about everybody, including Mark Twain, Diamond Jim Brady and the Prince of Wales. Toast her today by fixing her signature Hanky Panky, a fabulous mixture featuring equal parts gin and sweet vermouth. It starts off like a Martinez, but rather than maraschino liqueur and bitters, it receives a couple dashes of the bitter amaro Fernet-Branca for good measure.

Coleman created the cocktail for Sir Charles Hawtrey, a celebrated actor who visited the bar. As the story goes, he asked for a drink with a punch. Coleman served him this fine number, leading him to exclaim “By Jove! That is the real hanky-panky!” The name stuck.

This recipe is adapted from Charles H. Baker Jr.’s 1939 book, “The Gentleman’s Companion.”


Hanky Panky

If I were stranded on a desert island—a desert island with a bar, that is—and I could have only one book to use when my memory failed me, Harry Craddock’s 1930 “The Savoy Cocktail Book” would keep me company. It’s probably the 20th century’s most important tome of its kind, having preserved many of the era’s most important drinks.

Craddock, an American who fled the country when Prohibition hit in 1920, documented hundreds of drinks that he served (and, in some cases, invented) at American Bar in London’s swank Savoy Hotel. More than a few of them—the Pegu Club, for instance—are still served today in cocktail bars.

The Savoy Hotel closed in 2007 for a three-year renovation, reopening in October 2010 with a few new bells and whistles. But while the establishment has been updated and modernized, cocktail fans will still recognize the historic bar. And that’s where they can still order some of the bar’s most famous drinks.

Craddock wasn’t the only head bartender at the Savoy who stood out from the crowd. He followed Ada Coleman, after all. “Coley,” as she was known to her regulars, graced American Bar from 1903 until 1925 and served drinks to just about everybody, including Mark Twain, Diamond Jim Brady and the Prince of Wales. Toast her today by fixing her signature Hanky Panky, a fabulous mixture featuring equal parts gin and sweet vermouth. It starts off like a Martinez, but rather than maraschino liqueur and bitters, it receives a couple dashes of the bitter amaro Fernet-Branca for good measure.

Coleman created the cocktail for Sir Charles Hawtrey, a celebrated actor who visited the bar. As the story goes, he asked for a drink with a punch. Coleman served him this fine number, leading him to exclaim “By Jove! That is the real hanky-panky!” The name stuck.

This recipe is adapted from Charles H. Baker Jr.’s 1939 book, “The Gentleman’s Companion.”


Hanky Panky

If I were stranded on a desert island—a desert island with a bar, that is—and I could have only one book to use when my memory failed me, Harry Craddock’s 1930 “The Savoy Cocktail Book” would keep me company. It’s probably the 20th century’s most important tome of its kind, having preserved many of the era’s most important drinks.

Craddock, an American who fled the country when Prohibition hit in 1920, documented hundreds of drinks that he served (and, in some cases, invented) at American Bar in London’s swank Savoy Hotel. More than a few of them—the Pegu Club, for instance—are still served today in cocktail bars.

The Savoy Hotel closed in 2007 for a three-year renovation, reopening in October 2010 with a few new bells and whistles. But while the establishment has been updated and modernized, cocktail fans will still recognize the historic bar. And that’s where they can still order some of the bar’s most famous drinks.

Craddock wasn’t the only head bartender at the Savoy who stood out from the crowd. He followed Ada Coleman, after all. “Coley,” as she was known to her regulars, graced American Bar from 1903 until 1925 and served drinks to just about everybody, including Mark Twain, Diamond Jim Brady and the Prince of Wales. Toast her today by fixing her signature Hanky Panky, a fabulous mixture featuring equal parts gin and sweet vermouth. It starts off like a Martinez, but rather than maraschino liqueur and bitters, it receives a couple dashes of the bitter amaro Fernet-Branca for good measure.

Coleman created the cocktail for Sir Charles Hawtrey, a celebrated actor who visited the bar. As the story goes, he asked for a drink with a punch. Coleman served him this fine number, leading him to exclaim “By Jove! That is the real hanky-panky!” The name stuck.

This recipe is adapted from Charles H. Baker Jr.’s 1939 book, “The Gentleman’s Companion.”


Hanky Panky

If I were stranded on a desert island—a desert island with a bar, that is—and I could have only one book to use when my memory failed me, Harry Craddock’s 1930 “The Savoy Cocktail Book” would keep me company. It’s probably the 20th century’s most important tome of its kind, having preserved many of the era’s most important drinks.

Craddock, an American who fled the country when Prohibition hit in 1920, documented hundreds of drinks that he served (and, in some cases, invented) at American Bar in London’s swank Savoy Hotel. More than a few of them—the Pegu Club, for instance—are still served today in cocktail bars.

The Savoy Hotel closed in 2007 for a three-year renovation, reopening in October 2010 with a few new bells and whistles. But while the establishment has been updated and modernized, cocktail fans will still recognize the historic bar. And that’s where they can still order some of the bar’s most famous drinks.

Craddock wasn’t the only head bartender at the Savoy who stood out from the crowd. He followed Ada Coleman, after all. “Coley,” as she was known to her regulars, graced American Bar from 1903 until 1925 and served drinks to just about everybody, including Mark Twain, Diamond Jim Brady and the Prince of Wales. Toast her today by fixing her signature Hanky Panky, a fabulous mixture featuring equal parts gin and sweet vermouth. It starts off like a Martinez, but rather than maraschino liqueur and bitters, it receives a couple dashes of the bitter amaro Fernet-Branca for good measure.

Coleman created the cocktail for Sir Charles Hawtrey, a celebrated actor who visited the bar. As the story goes, he asked for a drink with a punch. Coleman served him this fine number, leading him to exclaim “By Jove! That is the real hanky-panky!” The name stuck.

This recipe is adapted from Charles H. Baker Jr.’s 1939 book, “The Gentleman’s Companion.”


Watch the video: Collection of Bartenders Premium Drinks - Chinese Tik Tok (July 2022).


Comments:

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