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Best Pâte Sablée Recipes

Best Pâte Sablée Recipes


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Pâte Sablée Shopping Tips

Be sure to purchase the correct flour a recipe calls for – flours differ in gluten or protein content, making each suited for specific tasks.

Pâte Sablée Cooking Tips

Insert a toothpick into the center of cakes, bar cookies, and quick breads to test for doneness – it should come out clean or only have a few crumbs clinging to it.


Pâte Sablée (Sweet Tart Dough)

Pâte Sablée is one of the three basic French pastry dough recipes. It’s sweet, crisp, and tender and is most commonly used for sweet tart dough. Scroll down for all you need to know to become a Pate Sablee master!


How to make Pâte Sablée

Pâte Sablée is a sweet and rich pastry made with flour, butter, icing sugar and egg yolk.

It’s rich and buttery and melts in the mouth. The proportion of butter to flour is much higher than in pâte sucrée (sweet dough), pâte brisée (Savoury Pie Dough) or Tart Pie Dough (Pâte à foncer).

Pâte Sablée is more fragile and difficult to handle due to the high butter content and use of egg yolk. The less the dough is handled the better. It should be kept cool at all times during handling, otherwise the butter will melt and toughen the dough during baking.

What should you use Pâte Sablée for?

It’s the best used for making shells for small fruit tartlets, lemon tarts, pecan pies and custard tarts. The shells are fragile, delicate and with a melt in the mouth texture. It can also be used as a base for cheese cake.

Pâte Sablée tarts are best eaten same day, so you can only use it if you plan to eat the tart, the same day.

It can also be used to make delicate cookies,that look like shortbread cookies, but are finer and more delicate, and melt in the mouth.

Pâte Sablée tarts cannot be kept in the fridge otherwise they’ll become soggy and unpleasant. They are best assembled just before serving.

Storage of Pâte Sablée Dough

If double wrapped, airtight, it will keep perfectly in the fridge for up to one week, or for up to 3 months in the freezer.

Michel used Pâte Sablée to make Sablés with blueberry mousse, Mini sablés, Catalan tart, Pecan pie, Pear clafoutis and mince pies.

How to Make Pâte Sablée

Heap the flour on the counter and make a well in the centre. Add the butter, sugar and salt into the well. With your fingertips mix and cream the butter with the sugar and salt.

then add the egg yolks and work them in delicately with your fingertips.

Little by little, draw the flour into the centre and work the mixture delicately with your fingers

until it forms a homogenous dough (the dough comes together).

Using the palm of your hand, push the dough away from you 3 to 4 times until it’s completely smooth.

Form into a disk, wrap with cling film and put in the fridge until ready to use.

Michel Roux's Pâte Sablée

Preparation time: 8 minutes Makes: 650g (1Ib 7oz)

Ingredients

  • 250g (2 cups, 8.8oz) all-purpose flour
  • 200g (7oz, 13 tablespoons ) butter cut into small cubes and slightly softened
  • 100g (3.5oz) confectioners (icing) sugar
  • Pinch of salt
  • 2 medium egg yolks, room temperature (you must use medium size egg yolks)

Instructions

  1. Heap the flour on the counter and make a well in the centre. Add the butter, sugar and salt into the well. With your fingertips mix and cream the butter with the sugar and salt, then add the egg yolks and work them in delicately with your fingertips.
  2. Little by little, draw the flour into the centre and work the mixture delicately with your fingers until it forms a homogenous dough (the dough comes together).
  3. Using the palm of your hand, push the dough away from you 3 to 4 times until it’s completely smooth. Form into a disk, wrap with cling film and put in the fridge until ready to use. The dough is better refrigerated overnight.
  4. Pâte Sablée is more fragile and delicate to work with thanpâte sucrée, but it melts in the mouth like no other dough. If well wrapped, it will keep perfectly in the fridge for up to one week, or for up to 3 months in the freezer.
  5. It’s recommended that you weigh all ingredients. If you’re using a mixer make sure the butter is at room temperature to avoid over-mixing the dough and forming gluten.

Using a stand mixer (Method from Jacquy Pfeiffer)

  1. Place the flour, room temperature butter and salt in the bowl of your stand mixer. Mix on low speed using the paddle attachment (K-beater) until the mixture is crumbly. Do not over-mix otherwise the dough will form gluten.
  2. Add the confectioners’ sugar and mix on low speed until the ingredients are just mixed together.
  3. Add the egg yolks and mix on medium speed until all the ingredients come together. As soon as they come together, stop. Do not over-mix!
  4. Scrape the dough out of the bowl and press it into a 1/2 inch thick rectangular block. Wrap air tight with cling film and refrigerate overnight.

Canadian Egg Sizes

Jumbo over 70g (2.5oz)
Extra Large 63-69g (2.2-2.4oz)
Large 56-62g (1.97-2.1 oz)
Medium 49-55g (1.7-1.94oz)


Pâte Sablée (Rich Pie Crust)

  • Quick Glance
  • (2)
  • 15 M
  • 1 H, 30 M
  • Makes enough for two 9-inch tarts

Ingredients US Metric

  • 1 pound all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons sea salt
  • 1 heaping tablespoon granulated sugar
  • 2 large egg yolks or 1 large egg
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons milk, cream, or water
  • 3 1/4 sticks unsalted butter (13 oz), softened

Directions

Sift the flour onto your work surface and shape it into a mound with a well in the center. Into the well, plop the salt, sugar, egg yolks or whole egg, and 2 tablespoons milk, cream, or water.

Using a spoon, stir the ingredients in the well until combined. Then gradually mix in the butter with the liquid ingredients in the well. Finally, using your hands, work the flour into the center of the well to combine it with the other ingredients. If necessary, add another tablespoon milk, cream, or water to create a smooth, soft dough. The dough must not be too firm. Do not overwork it, otherwise it’ll be tough. When it’s ready, the dough will be barely moistened and come together into a ball.

Working the pie crust dough as little as possible, gently divide it into 2 equal portions and shape them into disks. Stash the dough in resealable plastic bags and refrigerate until chilled through. (Because of the copious amount of butter in the dough, it may be a little tricky to roll out. Having the dough be properly chilled through helps minimize stickiness.)

Roll out the pie crust dough. It helps to roll it out between sheets of parchment paper or to simply forget rolling and instead press it into two 9-inch tart pans. Proceed with your preferred tart recipe.

T-Shirt Variation

  • Pâte Sablée Scrap Cookies

If you have any scraps of pâte sablée dough left over, reroll the the pie crust, cut into shapes, and bake on a parchment-lined baking sheet at 350°F (177°C) for about 10 minutes. Instant sugar cookies.

Recipe Testers' Reviews

I really enjoyed this slightly sweeter, richer version of traditional pastry. With the addition of sugar, egg yolks, and heavy cream, this dough was very tasty and great as the base for a fruit tart. The pie crust recipe made enough dough for four 9-inch pies or tarts. I used 2 large egg yolks in the dough. The method suggested for the recipe was very unique and not unlike making homemade pasta dough with the “well” method. (I wonder, though, if you could place all the dry ingredients in a food processor, then add the butter cut into small pieces, then moisten with the cream until the dough just comes together? The food processor method for making dough is my favorite and is a lot easier to clean up after, in my opinion. I will have to try the food processor method with these same ingredients next time.) When making the dough, I knew it was ready when the dough was just moistened and came together in a ball. I rolled it into 4 equal-size balls and chilled them before rolling them out to press into my tart pan. I used 1/4 of the dough for a blueberry and peach tart in which I pressed the dough into a tart pan with a removable bottom and then covered it with homemade blueberry jam and sliced peaches. I had a lot of dough left over, so I rolled it into balls, flattened them into disks, and placed them in a resealable plastic freezer bag and stashed them in the freezer. A wonderful dough to keep in the freezer and defrost when a pie or tart recipe sounds appealing.

This pie crust dough has extra fat and sugar compared to a regular pâte sablée recipe, so it's quite forgiving in terms of rolling and fitting it into a pan. I was able to just press together edges and use cut pieces to patch easily. This recipe produces enough dough for at least two 9-inch double-crust tarts. I didn't like the counter technique for mixing this and will go back to using my stand mixer as it’s a lot faster and less messy. I made a pear tart by rolling out the dough for the bottom, placing it into an 8-inch square pan, covering it with the filling, and then topping everything with more rolled out dough. The flavor was very good, and the dough was easy to work with. I took the leftover dough scraps, pushed them together, rolled them out, and cut them into shapes. Then I put them on a baking sheet, sprinkled them with sugar crystals, and baked them for about 10 minutes. Instant sugar cookies.

#LeitesCulinaria. We'd love to see your creations on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.


Ingredients

This Pastry Crust is made out of 5 very basic ingredients:

  • Flour: Plain / All Purpose, well sifted. Add a little bit of Salt to it to balance the flavours.
  • Sugar: use Icing or Powdered Sugar for a very smooth texture. And make sure to sift it too as icing sugar tends to get lumpy when stored.
  • Butter: Unsalted, cut into small cubes and really cold. The temperature is really important to get the "shortcrust" texture.
  • Egg: medium size, preferably at room temperature. I recommend whisking it in a small bowl separately before adding it to the dough, as it will incorporate more easily.

Optional Additions: Citrus Zest (if making a lemon tart for example, add some lemon zest to your crust!), Vanilla Powder, Freeze-Dried Berries for colour or even some Cacao Powder like I did for my Chocolate Pate Sablee.


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Pâte Sablée vs. Pâte Sucrée

If you weren’t confused enough, then this ought to do it — pâte sablée. I know, I know…how many pastry doughs do the French need?

A lot apparently because there are a few more pastry doughs I haven’t even mentioned, but for the sake of briefly breaking down the most common ones, I’m just going to clarify one last dough, pâte sablée.

This French pastry dough is typically not as sweet as pâte sucrée nor is it as smooth, for lack of a better word, as a pâte brisée. In fact, this French dough is specifically made to have a “sandier” or grittier texture on the palate, often through the addition of almond meal and/or more eggs.

The name is derived from the French word “le sable” which means sand. Remember those French butter cookies I shared here? Same concept.


Short Dough is a super versatile basic dough for the baker:

Short dough is a little less sweet than a sugar cookie dough and a little less rich than shortbread dough. This dough bakes up with a nice crisp bite and is strong enough to hold soft fillings like pastry cream or fresh fruit without getting soggy.

Short Dough couldn&rsquot be easier to make. Cream the butter and sugar, add the egg and then the flour.

The main difference from making a typical cookie dough is that you don&rsquot want to whip too much air into the butter and sugar.

If the dough gets too aerated the final tart crust might be more crumbly than crisp, and crisp is what you want for a good tart crust that will hold those softer fillings.

Mise en place&hellipassemble all your ingredients then the dough comes together in minutes.

Dump the dough out onto a floured surface and just a few quick kneads will bring it together.

If you have left over scraps from rolling a tart crust gather them up, double wrap in plastic wrap and freeze to use later.

Short dough is a great ingredient to keep in the freezer for last minute desserts.

One of my favorite ways to use the scraps left from rolling a tart crust are these short dough sandwich cookies. They&rsquore quick to make and look very elegant.

Chocolate Caramel Crackle Tart with short dough crust

If you love this recipe as much as I do, I&rsquod really appreciate a 5-star review.


Pâte Sucrée – pronounced “pat-sue-cray” – is the French term for a sweet pastry dough, traditionally used for tarts.

It is sweeter, crumblier and softer than pie doughs. I find that it actually resembles more like a shortbread cookie, which is why it is able to support even the heaviest fillings without falling apart.

This recipe is for the basic version, consisting of just flour, sugar, salt, butter and egg. If you want to spice things up, you can easily add spices or extracts. Cinnamon and ground ginger are great for the holidays. Coconut, cocoa powder and lemon extract are also yummy options, depending on the tart you are making.

As for the method, there are several different techniques for making pâte sucrée. After trying a few, I am sticking to the one that is the easiest. No fraisage, which is the technique of pressing the pastry against the counter with the heel of your hand.

Julia Child describes it as a way to ensure an even blending of fat and flour and claims it produces a crumblier and more tender crust. I honestly didn’t see much difference, so I’m choosing to skip it!

Some methods will have you cream softened butter and sugar together before adding the flour. Other recipes will ask you to use a food processor to save time, claiming that it also blends the flour and butter better.

I like to do mine by hand. Not sure why, but the results are always better that way!


Michel Roux’s Pâte sucrée (Sweet dough)

Pate sucrée contains a higher proportion of sugar and butter, and this makes it delicate and crumbly on the palate. In Professional kitchens, type 45 flour (pastry flour) is generally used to make this dough although type 55 (bread flour) my be used for a less fragile dough. The pastry is best eaten soon after it’s cooked.

If you have left overs put it in a dry airtight container for a few days. This pastry is excellent for fruit tarts and can also be used for cheese cake base. Once baked, the pastry shell is quite firm and hard and easy to handle.

Pâte Sucrée is more steady than the more crumbly Pâte Sablée because it contains less butter in proportion to flour.

Heap the flour onto the counter and make a well in the centre.

Put the butter, sugar, and salt into the well. Mix the butter sugar and salt with your fingertips.

Gradually draw the flour into the centre and mix with your fingertips until the dough becomes slightly grainy.

Again, make a well in the centre and add the eggs. Work them into the flour mixture using your fingertips

until the dough begins to hold together.

Knead the dough 4-5 times with the palm of your hands until smooth.

Form the dough into a disk and wrap with cling film. It will be a soft almost sticky dough. Rest the dough in the fridge for 1-2 hours or until it firms up before using.

To use, roll the dough to 1/16-1/8 inch (2-3mm) thickness.

Pâte Sucrée

Preparation time: 15 minutes Makes: about 1Ib 3oz 520g

Ingredients

  • 275g (2 cups + 2 tablespoons, 9.7 oz) all-purpose flour
  • 100g (3.5 oz, 6½ tablespoons) butter, cubed and slightly softened
  • 100g (3.5oz, 3/4 cup) confectioners (icing) sugar, sifted
  • Pinch of salt
  • 2 medium eggs at room temperature (**you must use medium eggs)

Instructions

  1. Heap the flour onto the counter and make a well in the centre. Put the butter, sugar, and salt into the well. Mix the butter sugar and salt with your fingertips.
  2. Gradually draw the flour into the centre and mix with your fingertips until the dough becomes slightly grainy.
  3. Again, make a well in the centre and add the eggs. Work them into the flour mixture using your fingertips until the dough begins to hold together.
  4. Knead the dough 4-5 times with the palm of your hands until smooth. Form the dough into a disk and wrap with cling film. It will be a soft but firm dough (not sticky).
  5. Rest the dough in the fridge for 1-2 hours or until it firms up before using.
  6. Roll the dough to 1/16-1/8 inch (2-3mm) thickness.

Important Points to Note

  1. Original recipe called for 250g flour but 275g worked better for me. For this recipe you will achieve better results if you weigh ingredients.
  2. This recipe absolutely requires medium eggs (50g (1.7oz) or crack eggs, beat and weigh 90g of egg.
  3. For cup measures: spoon the flour into the cup, heaping it up over the top, then slide a knife across the top to level off the extra. Be careful not to shake or tap the cup to settle down the flour or you will have more than you need. I use a 240ml, American cup.

Egg Sizes Minimum weight per egg in the shell

Jumbo 70 g (2.5oz)
Extra Large 63 g (2.2oz)
Large 56 g (2 oz)
Medium 49 g (1.7oz)

Own notes: the shell weighs about 7g. Most medium eggs without shell weigh about 44-45g


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Watch the video: La pâte sablée - Techniques de base en cuisine (July 2022).


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